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Test Methods for Microbiology of PET Bottles


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#1 Rehman R.

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 11:11 PM

Hello Everyone!

 

I need help finding internationally recognized test methods for PET bottles microbiology such as ISO standards or FDA guidelines etc. As for now, I am unable to find anyone, all the information available is only relevant to food microbiology only.

 

Thank you!

Rehman



#2 nwells1024

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 01:36 AM

I work in the packaging industry and recently have looked into microbiological testing for mold, yeast, and coliforms.  We were struggling to find any industry standards for food packaging; just food.  I finally consulted a contract microbiological lab and was informed by one of their head scientists that the focus on microbes in packaging has become much more intense in the past few years but no such standards exist.

 

Good luck finding better results than I!



#3 Charles.C

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 02:39 AM

Hi Rehman,

 

Afaik due to the temperatures typically used in manufacturing process, plastic bottles should be sterile unless subsequently contaminated by environment, handling etc.

 

Offhand I’m not aware of any official, compiled, general microbiological  test procedures for food packaging although specific packaging sectors certainly have their own systems. Forum members  in the Packaging industry may know more than me.

 

Test Procedures in use typically involve initial direct swabbing of  accessible food contact surfaces (fcs)  or  via  rinsing procedures for vessels. These procedures are detailed in standard micro texts, eg APHA.

The solution resulting from the swabbing or rinse is analysed via standard bacteriolological procedures (eg BAM on-line).

 

For yr general case, please have a look at the attached files in the thread linked below which, inter alia, cover micro. standards plastic bottles (eg post 4,2) and analytical procedures as applied to the “solution” (eg Post 2) –

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...-for-packaging/

 

If you would like to study some other threads here on micro. packaging can try the links in this post –

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ant/#entry68502

 

Hello Everyone!

 

I need help finding internationally recognized test methods for PET bottles microbiology such as ISO standards or FDA guidelines etc. As for now, I am unable to find anyone, all the information available is only relevant to food microbiology only.

 

Thank you!

Rehman


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 11 May 2017 - 06:30 PM

The pasteurized milk ordinance (PMO) has microbial standards for single use packaging (of all types) and packaging contact materials (like slip sheets) in Appendix J:

 

C. BACTERIAL STANDARDS AND EXAMINATION OF SINGLE-SERVICE CONTAINERS AND/OR CLOSURES 1. Paper stock shall meet the bacteriological standard of not more than two hundred fifty (250) colonies per gram as determined by the disintegration test. The paper stock supplier shall certify that their paper stock was manufactured in compliance with this Standard. This applies only to the paper stock prior to lamination. 2. Where a rinse test can be used, the residual microbial count shall not exceed fifty (50) per container, except that in containers less than 100 mL, the count shall not exceed ten (10), or when using the swab test, not over fifty (50) colonies per fifty (50) cm 2 (1 per square centimeter) of product-contact surface in three (3) out of four (4) samples taken at random on a given day. All single-service containers and closures shall be free of coliform organisms. 3. During any consecutive six (6) months, at least four (4) sample sets shall be collected in at least four (4) separate months, except when three (3) months show a month containing two (2) sampling dates separated by at least twenty (20) days, and analyzed at an Official, Commercial or Industry Laboratory approved by the Milk Laboratory Control Agency specifically for the examinations required under these Standards. (Refer to Item 12p of this Ordinance for sampling of containers and closures in milk plants.) 4. When a single-service container or closure is made from one (1) or more component parts as defined in this document, only those final assembled products that may have product-contact surface(s), shall be sampled and tested for compliance with Section C. 5. A sample set from each manufacturing line, as defined in these Standards, shall consist of a minimum of four (4) containers and/or closures, when the rinse test is used, or a minimum of four (4) 250 cm2 areas of surface, when the swab test is used. 6. The following criteria pertain to manufacturers of pre-forms and bottles preformed at one (1) plant and molded at a second plant: a. The pre-forming plant shall be IMS Listed but sampling of the pre-forms is not required at this plant. b. If the first pre-forming plant is also molding the containers into their final form, this plant shall be listed and the containers shall be sampled at this plant. c. If the second plant, where containers are molded into their final form, is a single-service manufacturer, this plant shall be listed and the containers shall be sampled at this plant. d. If the second plant is a milk plant where containers are molded into their final form, for use only in that milk plant, the milk plant listing is sufficient, but the containers shall be sampled at this plant. Procedures for obtaining samples and for the laboratory examination of these products are contained in the latest edition of SMEDP and shall be in substantial compliance with these methods. Such procedures and examinations shall be evaluated in accordance with the current revision of the EML. A list of approved laboratories may be found in the current IMS List, which is published by FDA and available on the Internet at: http://www.fda.gov/F.../ucm2007965.htm.

 

 

And bottled water GMP's have standards as well: https://www.accessda...rt=129&showFR=1

a bacteriological swab and/or rinse count should be made from at least four containers and closures selected just prior to filling and sealing. No more than one of the four samples may exceed more than one bacteria per milliliter of capacity or one colony per square centimeter of surface area. All samples shall be free of coliform organisms. The procedure and apparatus for these bacteriological tests shall be in conformance with those recognized by the government agency or agencies having jurisdiction. Tests shall be performed either by qualified plant personnel or a competent commercial laboratory.

 


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Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

#5 Charles.C

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 03:07 AM

Hi 3F,

 

Thks yr quotes. The most practical OP-useful bit in yr quote is probably -

 

Procedures for obtaining samples and for the laboratory examination of these products are contained in the latest edition of SMEDP and shall be in substantial compliance with these methods.

 

Unfortunately the manual SMEDP requires money or a good Technical Library. (Or micro. books for routine methods).

 

JFI, this is a fairly straightforward  "rinse" method from a (much) older edition of SMEDP to that currently in use -

 

Milk Can

 

1. Carefully introduce directly from a bottle 100ml of sterile water into the can to be tested.

 

2. Replace the can cover and shake vigorously 25 times, making sure to wet the entire inner surface of the can and cover. remove the cover and pour the rinse water bck into a sterile container avoiding as far as practicable contamination from the lip of the can.

 

3. By means of a sterile pipette, transfer 1ml ofthe rise water to a culture dish and pour agar plates in the usual manner. If high counts are expected, it may be necessary to dilute this rinse water before plating.

 

4. After 48 hrs incubation, all recognisable colonies on the plate should be counted with the aid of an approved colony counter.

 

Calculation

 

Assuming that 1ml of the 100ml of rinse water was plated, the number of colonies on the plate multiplied by 100 is considered as the plate count per can and cover.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#6 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 02:57 PM

Use Charles' procedure. Otherwise, an EPA accredited lab I use has container -closure instructions here. It's not a super strong citation but will probably be professional enough for most auditors.


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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 07:05 PM

Use Charles' procedure. Otherwise, an EPA accredited lab I use has container -closure instructions here. It's not a super strong citation but will probably be professional enough for most auditors.

 

Hi 3F,

 

Nice looking reference. Thanks.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 Rehman R.

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 05:21 PM

Hi 3F,

 

Thks yr quotes. The most practical OP-useful bit in yr quote is probably -

 

 

Unfortunately the manual SMEDP requires money or a good Technical Library. (Or micro. books for routine methods).

 

JFI, this is a fairly straightforward  "rinse" method from a (much) older edition of SMEDP to that currently in use -

 

Milk Can

 

1. Carefully introduce directly from a bottle 100ml of sterile water into the can to be tested.

 

2. Replace the can cover and shake vigorously 25 times, making sure to wet the entire inner surface of the can and cover. remove the cover and pour the rinse water bck into a sterile container avoiding as far as practicable contamination from the lip of the can.

 

3. By means of a sterile pipette, transfer 1ml ofthe rise water to a culture dish and pour agar plates in the usual manner. If high counts are expected, it may be necessary to dilute this rinse water before plating.

 

4. After 48 hrs incubation, all recognisable colonies on the plate should be counted with the aid of an approved colony counter.

 

Calculation

 

Assuming that 1ml of the 100ml of rinse water was plated, the number of colonies on the plate multiplied by 100 is considered as the plate count per can and cover.

 

 

Use Charles' procedure. Otherwise, an EPA accredited lab I use has container -closure instructions here. It's not a super strong citation but will probably be professional enough for most auditors.

 

Thank you for your inputs.

 

Actually, the lab is going for accreditation against ISO 17025 and accreditation body here requires the labs to only use internationally recognized or published methods otherwise lab should validate their test methods but lab management doesn't want to get into the validation process. So, we are still searching.



#9 Charles.C

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 03:59 AM

Thank you for your inputs.

 

Actually, the lab is going for accreditation against ISO 17025 and accreditation body here requires the labs to only use internationally recognized or published methods otherwise lab should validate their test methods but lab management doesn't want to get into the validation process. So, we are still searching.

 

Hi Rehman,

 

I can assure you that the two organisations mentioned in my previous posts are internationally recognised. Highly.

 

But I cannot speak for the situation in Pakistan.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#10 Rehman R.

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 12:29 PM

Hi 3F,

 

Thks yr quotes. The most practical OP-useful bit in yr quote is probably -

 

 

Unfortunately the manual SMEDP requires money or a good Technical Library. (Or micro. books for routine methods).

 

JFI, this is a fairly straightforward  "rinse" method from a (much) older edition of SMEDP to that currently in use -

 

Milk Can

 

1. Carefully introduce directly from a bottle 100ml of sterile water into the can to be tested.

 

2. Replace the can cover and shake vigorously 25 times, making sure to wet the entire inner surface of the can and cover. remove the cover and pour the rinse water bck into a sterile container avoiding as far as practicable contamination from the lip of the can.

 

3. By means of a sterile pipette, transfer 1ml ofthe rise water to a culture dish and pour agar plates in the usual manner. If high counts are expected, it may be necessary to dilute this rinse water before plating.

 

4. After 48 hrs incubation, all recognisable colonies on the plate should be counted with the aid of an approved colony counter.

 

Calculation

 

Assuming that 1ml of the 100ml of rinse water was plated, the number of colonies on the plate multiplied by 100 is considered as the plate count per can and cover.

 

Hi Charles

 

I have found a copy of SMEDP and tried reading through but could not locate the information you described here, Could you please let me know, in which chapter it is described?

 

Thank You



#11 Charles.C

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 05:50 PM

Hi Charles

 

I have found a copy of SMEDP and tried reading through but could not locate the information you described here, Could you please let me know, in which chapter it is described?

 

Thank You

 

Hi RehmanR,

 

The quote was from 2nd ed.Ch 6 but, as i noted, this is an (very) old text and the layout has likely changed/been revised. Limits were also mentioned but i refrained to include since likely also out-of-date.

 

There is a considerably expanded but analogous methodology in the APHA manual,4th ed,2001,Ch3 which is maybe penultimate to the current one.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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