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Feedback on a Drain Cleaning SSOP

sanitationcleaning drains cross contamination SSOP listeria SOP environmental

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#1 peeviewonder

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 03:40 PM

Hello Everyone,

 

I have looked all over the internet, and emailed old professors, but I can't find a drain cleaning SSOP that I feel is very thorough, or really takes into account a lot of the hazards that may arise from cleaning drains. I have looked through these message boards and they have been a huge help. I know there are some food sanitation books out there, but they are way out of my budget. 

 

I would be eternally grateful if anyone would take a look at this SSOP I created and give me some feedback. Am I missing anything? Have I overlooked any hazards? Am I using the wrong chemicals? How far should equipment be from drains when cleaning? Should drains be cleaned first and THEN the floor? What if this is not possible (pushback from production)? Should drains/floor cleaning be one SSOP? 

 

For some background: we manufacture, age, cut/wrap, and warehouse/ship cheese at my company. We are under FDA and PMO grade B regulations. It is a wet cleaning facility. We have extended aging in high moisture environments, where the cheese is exposed (it has to be this way). The cheese is high moisture, fairly neutral pH, and mold-ripened.

 

Please let me know if you need any additional information, I know a lot of times people ask for help and don't give any background info. Thank you for taking a look and giving me feedback.

Cheers

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#2 tessalouwho

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 03:44 PM

Interesting this was brought up yesterday in a customer audit. One of the items she mentioned was we do not state what the employee needs to do when finishing cleaning the drains. ie wash hands, change apron, etc.. 

 

Also you should state when should they wash the drains? at the end of the day at the start of the CIP's, before the floor is cleaned etc.. 

 

 



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#3 Scampi

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 04:41 PM

The SSOP looks good to me with one exception.........i don't think there should be any product in the room being cleaned, it's just not worth the risk because someone IS going to use the high pressure hose on the drain and they WILL NOT tell you

 

I do have one question though, why are you using 2 chemicals that can be this harmful if mixed?  I have used an acid wash in previous post on poultry shackles as the foam from the scald tank gets baked on and it was the only option to save 6 hours of manual labour, but it was stored separate from chlorine and the two were never used on the same shift


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#4 peeviewonder

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 05:49 PM

Scampi,

We use the quat because I have been told it is great for drains. We don't have another soap that doesn't have chlorine in it. Is there anything you would recommend? I am totally open to changing. Thanks for the feedback, I really appreciate it.



#5 Scampi

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:28 PM

Really i think your best bet is to have some technical sales reps come to your facility. They know best.....just makes me nervous using 2 chemicals in the same night with such a risk

 

 

PerQuat technology appears to be the best thing going for drains....effective on gram negative and positive bacteria and will eat through any biofilm


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#6 kgonzalez

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:30 PM

The place I was at previously used an orange safety cone as a drain brush shield - it was actually the perfect size, shape, with the right size opening at the top to slide over the drain brush handle. it's no replacement for keeping product and surfaces away from the drain being cleaned, but it does add a little extra protection.

 

One thing to consider is storage of drain cleaning tools when not in use - my preference is to keep them in sanitizer in a designated black bucket, sanitizer rinsed out and replenished each time the drains are cleaned.



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#7 ishpateka

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Posted 05 March 2020 - 06:25 AM

Hi, Can anyone suggest an outline or a standard for the amount of build-up inside a drain, to identify this drains needs to be cleaned? 



#8 MsMars

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Posted 06 March 2020 - 09:16 PM

Hi, Can anyone suggest an outline or a standard for the amount of build-up inside a drain, to identify this drains needs to be cleaned? 

 

It depends on how your drain is structured and what your product/process is.  Past facilities I've worked at usually performed floor drain cleaning weekly and more extensive cleaning of the entire drain system on a monthly basis, more often if indicated by EMP.



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