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Chemicals to perform allergen clean

allergen chemical sanitize clean

Best Answer PropellerPete, 16 May 2018 - 03:30 PM

Thank you all very much! I have a working plan, and MsMars, you are absolutely right--I have to go back to the beginning, use logic, and evaluate this process myself. You guys rock, this forum is great!

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#1 PropellerPete

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 05:22 PM

Hello all,

 

My team is currently using Sanibet for our allergen cleaning process(brush off, vacuum, spray, wipe down). I have been told, by our previous SQF practitioner, that given enough time(5 minutes or so), the Sanibet will destroy the protein in milk, soy, treenuts and peanuts. Current verification testing does not coincide with this information, and this would be at a concentration of 300 ppm I think. My question is, what do other companies out there use as allergen removal chemicals that are food-safe? Our product is RTE grains and I don't want to do a rinse or wet-clean after the wipe down. I have tried googling my keywords, but am at a loss! Any suggestions?



#2 jdpaul

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 06:08 PM

I can't think of any commonly used allergen removal chemicals other than the routine sanitation of an approved cleaning agent and hot water. I noticed your steps in your allergen cleaning and that there is no allergen verification. How are you showing that the milk protein isn't present anymore? 



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#3 MsMars

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 07:04 PM

I don't have much experience with dry clean processes in terms of removing allergens but without doing a thorough wet clean to remove gross dry particles from the line, I wouldn't think that a sanitizer alone would be able to remove allergenic proteins - same theory as to why you cannot effectively use hand sanitizer on hands with gross contamination. 



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#4 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 07:06 PM

Ditto the above. Allergen cleaning based on "denaturing allergen proteins" is not really validated anywhere. It may absolutely the case that there is an effect, but none so dramatic as to be relied on as a validated control method.

 

You have to actually remove the allergens, as stated above this normally requires detergent and water.


Austin Bouck
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Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

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#5 Scampi

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 08:14 PM

after reading the product info.....search for new chemicals. 

 

Agreed with PP, your process is not designed to remove allergenic proteins....

 

If I were you, I'd reach out to chemical companies and tell them what you are trying to achieve....use them to your advantage

 

If I were you, there would be a wet clean in between each allergen run and perform allergen removal validation, it's the only way to be sure


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


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#6 PropellerPete

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 08:20 PM

Thank you all for your answers! Let me expand upon this a bit further: We use "dry" cleaning methods due to the absence of floor drains in our production area, and this is a clean-in-place procedure. We can't use more water than we can easily mop up is what I'm getting at. From what I gather, most peoples' methods include a bit more water than a spray bottle puts out, and a detergent before the sanitizer? We do use a snap-test to verify after a clean, which is how I know it's not as effective as it needs to be. Can anyone recommend a good detergent to use in food production, or share their methods?



#7 Scampi

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 08:46 PM

The chemicals are vast and broad and really dependent on your water supply (temp ph etc)

 

I personally stay away from the big guys (you know the ones) the smaller companies usually provide superior customer service for the same price or less

 

Rinse

Foam/Clean

Rinse 

Inspect

Clean again

Rinse

Sanitize

Air Dry


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


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#8 PropellerPete

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 08:54 PM

The chemicals are vast and broad and really dependent on your water supply (temp ph etc)

 

I personally stay away from the big guys (you know the ones) the smaller companies usually provide superior customer service for the same price or less

 

Rinse

Foam/Clean

Rinse 

Inspect

Clean again

Rinse

Sanitize

Air Dry

I think I need to back up here and clarify a definition or two. I apologize for the circuitous nature of this post! I am looking at SQF ed. 8 for food mnfg. 2.8.1.4 that states: Where allergenic material may be intentionally or unintentionally present, cleaning and sanitation of product contact surfaces between line changeovers shall be effective, appropriate to the risk and legal requirements, and sufficient to remove all potential target allergens...…..to prevent cross contact. Our production line doesn't touch raw food ingredients, only the outside of product contact packaging(cardboard cup). Our food contact surfaces include bins(we use liners) and scooping spoons. If I am interpreting this correctly, we should be swabbing our spoons, not the production line? I can't tell if I'm getting closer to the light or further away!  :helpplease:



#9 jdpaul

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:03 PM

Please look at this chemical - it can be used on food contact surfaces. We used it in our allergen testing lab to remove any potential allergens after our ELISA testing. 



#10 jdpaul

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:04 PM

https://alconox.com/tergazyme/



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#11 jdpaul

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:40 PM

If the line is dedicated you should be swabbing the line after cleaning for that allergen. If you aren't using dedicated utensils for that line you should be swabbing them as well as that would be part of your allergen cleaning verification



#12 jdpaul

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:40 PM

if the line is not dedicated*



#13 PropellerPete

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:45 PM

if the line is not dedicated*

Does that even apply to the line if no food touches the line, just the outside of the cardboard cup that houses the food touches the line? Utensils and bins are the only actual food contact surface(the cup is the barrier between the line and the food). I think my error is the definition of "product contact surface" in 2.8.1.4



#14 jdpaul

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:49 PM

So then you answered your own question. If it is not a product contact surface then the rule does not apply

 

"Where allergenic material may be intentionally or unintentionally present, cleaning and sanitation of product contact surfaces between line changeovers shall be effective, appropriate to the risk and legal requirements, and sufficient to remove all potential target allergens"

 

 

 

Where allergenic material is not intentionally or unintentionally present, cleaning and sanitation of product contact surfaces between line changeovers is not necessary



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#15 PropellerPete

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 09:53 PM

So then you answered your own question. If it is not a product contact surface then the rule does not apply

 

"Where allergenic material may be intentionally or unintentionally present, cleaning and sanitation of product contact surfaces between line changeovers shall be effective, appropriate to the risk and legal requirements, and sufficient to remove all potential target allergens"

 

 

 

Where allergenic material is not intentionally or unintentionally present, cleaning and sanitation of product contact surfaces between line changeovers is not necessary

Thank you for that clarification! I didn't understand that the definition of "product" here referred to the food itself rather than the finished product.



#16 jdpaul

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 10:03 PM

Well the scope of "product" would include in-process food stuffs as well as the end finished product food stuffs



#17 PropellerPete

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Posted 15 May 2018 - 10:12 PM

Well the scope of "product" would include in-process food stuffs as well as the end finished product food stuffs

Are you saying then, that if it were you, you would still verify the absence of allergens on the production line in between changeovers even though no actual food is touching the line? I have looked for a definition of "product" and can only seem to find vague answers. 



#18 jdpaul

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 10:47 AM

No i am saying that when foodstuffs (in-process or finished product) contacts a food contact surface then the rule applies

 

when foodstuffs (in-process or finished product) does not contact a food contact surface the rule does not apply



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#19 MsMars

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 12:23 PM

Sounds like you need to go back to the beginning and do a risk assessment of your process.  If you can risk assess and also do a validation study to prove that no contamination occurs between your line and your cups, then you would have no reason to be swabbing your production line for the purposes of allergen cleanup verification. Obviously if you cannot validate that you would have no cross-contamination between the line and the cups, you will need to investigate more sufficient ways of cleaning your line and possibly need to explore a wet clean process.



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#20 PropellerPete

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 03:30 PM   Best Answer

Thank you all very much! I have a working plan, and MsMars, you are absolutely right--I have to go back to the beginning, use logic, and evaluate this process myself. You guys rock, this forum is great!



#21 MsMars

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 04:07 PM

Sometimes when things start getting a little murky you just have to take a step back and look at the big picture again.  Good luck! :) 







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