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#1 QA_123

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 01:12 PM

I am helping to update our master sanitation schedule.  Currently we have it on the wall which we do not like.  Im not sure why or who set it up that way.  Are there any specific rules as to how it is presented?  Can it be in a binder?  Any help with a master sanitation schedule would be great. 

 

Thank you.  



#2 Scampi

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 01:29 PM

You, the plant manager and the sanitation manager are the only ones who need to see the master schedule (well, and the auditor of course)

 

It's sole purpose is to ensure things that are not done daily do not get missed and become an issue

 

At my previous posts, sanitation had both daily records and a weekly record and it was up to me to ensure everything on the master list got completed. I didn't care what day of the week the weekly tasks were completed, just that they got done (some nights a plant may be in worse shape than others---this way you're never out of compliance)

 

There was also a monthly list.....there may only be 3 items on it and they had all month to get it done

 

Then you simply need to verify that the tasks are getting done within the time frame----pre op and swabs take care of the on floor verification of how clean the plant is

 

Hope this helps


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#3 QA_123

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 03:28 PM

Thank you for your help.  Yes it does help.  



#4 mgourley

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 08:50 PM

It makes no difference what it looks like, as long as it meets any specific content requirements imposed by a specific certification standard.

 

Over the years I have done mine hand written on the big wall pinned sheets from AIB, smaller versions  of the same thing that I did in Excel, the entire thing done completely in Excel, the entire thing done in Access, and now one done in Food Safety Management software. Never had an issue with an auditor.

 

However you decide to do it, ensure that it at least contains all the equipment, tools and structures in the facility; the frequency of cleaning of each item; when the item was completed.

 

Marshall



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#5 SQFconsultant

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 08:52 PM

In a binder is fine.


Kind regards,

 

Glenn Oster
 
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#6 QA_123

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 02:06 PM

Update.....  My Sanitation Manager and myself updated our master sanitation schedule and we are so happy that we did.  We now have a sheet for tasks that need to be done weekly, twice weekly, monthly, every three months, every 6 months, yearly.  We keep each one on a clip board and have it hung so we all have access to them.  This way if we have any employees that need a job to do or for some reason we have a line shut down we can just look at the lists and they can work on something that needs to be done.  Whoever does each task signs off on it.  This way we are all helping out with sanitation since it is such a big task.  For us this works great.  

 

Thank you for all of your help.



#7 SQFconsultant

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 04:11 PM

That's,nice. But then it becomes a none schedule in that stud on the "schedule" only gets done when people have the spare time or feel like it.


Kind regards,

 

Glenn Oster
 
GOC GROUP / +1.772.646.4115 / Food - Food Packaging - Food Storage/DC

SQF, BRC & IFS System Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants

Serving Small-to-Mid-Size Businesses | Now accepting: BTC, XRP, ETH, DAI, USDCoin & LTC

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http://www.GlennOsterConsulting.com  -- 

 

 

Red October? Possibly - more like Green

Get the GOC C-CUR Guide (PDF)

https://bit.ly/36hW9Z2

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

#8 QA_123

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 06:30 PM

No, its not only done in spare time.  The Sanitation Manager is responsible for making sure all tasks are done.  However, if somebody has some extra time they will help him with the smaller tasks.  He is still primarily responsible for making sure it is all done on time and properly.  If we tried to get every task on the schedule done in spare time we would never be able to keep up.  



#9 JMISANITATION

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 01:13 AM

If anyone needs help with Master Sanitation, my company has been in business for 29 years in California and we have experience and expertise. Would love to connect with you all



#10 KevWFJ

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Posted 26 March 2019 - 04:37 PM

I am currently in the same issue, the new company I'm at does not have a written sanitation program (of any kind). We are a small pickling company that falls under the high acidified foods category. Essentially I am going to have to write a sanitation program. If anyone has any good ways to develop a program from nothing, I would greatly appreciate the input.



#11 QA_123

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 07:50 PM

What I am doing now is working well for us and my USDA Inspector is happy with it.  



#12 mgourley

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 08:37 PM

I am currently in the same issue, the new company I'm at does not have a written sanitation program (of any kind). We are a small pickling company that falls under the high acidified foods category. Essentially I am going to have to write a sanitation program. If anyone has any good ways to develop a program from nothing, I would greatly appreciate the input.

 

Just a few things to get you started in no particular order:

1. Identify equipment, utensils and structures (floors, walls, drains, overheads, etc.)

2. Identify how to clean the stuff (this can come from equipment manuals that your maintenance department probably has).

3. Identify how often the stuff needs to be cleaned (again, there may be recommendations in equipment manuals).

4. Write cleaning procedures for the items you have identified.

5. Schedule all of this work.

6. Conduct some type of post-cleaning evaluation, to ensure the stuff is indeed "clean".

7. Train your people, utilizing the procedure you have developed. Since you are starting from scratch, I'll tell you upfront that you will be re-writing a lot of these procedures.

8. Train your people to NOT clean something that does not need to be cleaned. Instead, empower then to "let somebody know" that it looks clean. The supervisor or manager should go investigate and make a determination. This helps you to review your schedule. Say you scheduled some light fixtures for cleaning every two weeks. After two weeks they are still clean. Maybe you might want to change the frequency to monthly,

This also saves time. If people are not spending time cleaning things that do not need cleaned, they have more time to spend cleaning things that really do need the attention. You mentioned that you are a small operation. This step is extremely valuable to you.

9. Document your cleaning activities and verification.

10. Procure the help of a good cleaning chemical supplier. The good ones will work with you to identify the proper chemicals you need and will train your employees on the proper use of those chemicals. Some may even write your procedures.

 

There is a lot more to it, and I intentionally did not make this post specific.

If you have specific questions as you get this thing going, I'd be happy to help out if I can.

 

Marshall


Edited by mgourley, 27 March 2019 - 08:41 PM.


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#13 QA_123

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Posted 27 March 2019 - 09:07 PM

Our chemical guy got me started. He basically gave me a template to follow for each piece of equipment. From there our sanitation manager wrote all of our procedures for each piece of machinery, equipment, etc. and i put the book together for him. Training is key.



#14 Scampi

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Posted 28 March 2019 - 12:59 PM

Training is absolutely key..............and so is understanding where bacteria may hide

 

A good sanitation crew and procedures are the 2 most important factors in maintaining good hygiene in the physical plant. This is almost always where problems start.

 

My other piece of advice is to LISTEN to your chemical vendor (and I personally shy away from the massive companies, but that's just me)  They are in the business of helping you succeed. They have access to a talent pool you don't even know exists!

 

A good chem company WILL train your employees---------the sanitation diamond.............the bottom up/top down approach........all of it

 

From experience, we are all really good at food safety...............Sanitation minded folks are specialists too...........let them do their job  (and often overlooked and underpaid)


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#15 QA_123

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Posted 29 March 2019 - 03:23 PM

I agree with you Scampi



#16 will.merrill

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Posted 13 June 2019 - 07:37 PM

Does anyone have a template to share?



#17 Charles.C

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Posted 14 June 2019 - 09:41 AM

Does anyone have a template to share?

 

There are a multitude scattered about this Forum, eg -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...le/#entry141813

 

Unfortunately they often need to be customised for yr process to be of much local use.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#18 QA_123

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 01:20 PM

I basically just broke everything down to when it needs to be done.... daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly, bi-monthly, quarterly, and yearly.  I made a list and for each task that needs to be done in that time frame and a place for the date it was done and signature of person who completed the task.  It is working well for us.  Some of the smaller tasks can be done by people who are "extras" on low staffed days to help the sanitation crew out.  It is the responsibility of the sanitation manager to make sure his crew gets all of the tasks done and on time.  We keep these lists on clip boards hanging on a wall so everybody can see what needs to be done.  That way if say third shift has an extra person who needs something to do they can look at the list and pick something that needs to be done.  Our USDA Inspector was happy with it and it seems to be working well for us.  We have changed the lists a couple times.  Some things we realized needed taken care of more often or not as often as we originally thought.  Then when each sheet is complete it is given to me and I keep them in a binder.  For years we had a huge list on the wall.  It was a confusing mess.  Things were not getting done simply because the list was so confusing.  this way its very clear and anybody can understand what needs to be done and when.  



#19 QA_123

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Posted 27 June 2019 - 01:24 PM

I almost forgot... We also have a binder that has a cleaning procedure for everything in the plant.... everything from the mats that they stand on to the freezers, and everything in between.  Each thing shows how to clean it, what protective gear to wear, what chemicals or cleaning solutions to use.  






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