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Cold Spray for burns on Production Floor

burns cold spray food grade SQF packaging manufacturing safety

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#1 00half

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 12:50 PM

We recently had an injury involving an employee suffering major burns as they were working around our glue applicators.  We have looked into some sort of cold spray or cold wipes for burns and putting them out near our glue applicators but couldn't find any that were food grade.  What are some ways other SQF Pracititoners have implemented these into their procedures and what precautions they took that kept the auditors happy.  Thank you


Edited by 00half, 10 April 2019 - 12:51 PM.


#2 Scampi

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 12:58 PM

So first and foremost you need to get that piece of equipment guarded so this doesn't happen again

 

You really should have a first aid kit that is close and accessible because even in the safest environment, accidents do happen

 

 

I would simply install a first aid kit on the wall, like every other factory. Then you've covered OSHA AND the products are not readily available. If the SQF auditor doesn't like that, tell them to pound salt, your employees H&S comes first (or at least it should)

 

There are not any "food grade" products available, but there is also nothing in the SQF code that prevents you from installing a kit that it kept closed provided it is regularly inspected for cleanliness and being intact 


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


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#3 kfromNE

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 01:06 PM

I agree with Scampi. We have a first aid cabinet stocked by a 3rd party. It's hung up on a wall right outside of production.

 

If you really did want something food grade - you may be able to find an aloe vera product that is though I wouldn't bother. Install a first aid kit near the area and be done with it.



#4 00half

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 01:39 PM

So first and foremost you need to get that piece of equipment guarded so this doesn't happen again

 

You really should have a first aid kit that is close and accessible because even in the safest environment, accidents do happen

 

 

I would simply install a first aid kit on the wall, like every other factory. Then you've covered OSHA AND the products are not readily available. If the SQF auditor doesn't like that, tell them to pound salt, your employees H&S comes first (or at least it should)

 

There are not any "food grade" products available, but there is also nothing in the SQF code that prevents you from installing a kit that it kept closed provided it is regularly inspected for cleanliness and being intact 

 

Unfortunately in this situation, the employee didn't follow proper protocol and didn't verify everything was turned off and powered down before working on the machine.



#5 Scampi

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 01:56 PM

oooooooooooh, that's not good..........i know here the incident would be investigated and if the employeer couldn't prove that the proper training had been provided following the proper schedule, they'd be on the hook for a huge fine.

 

it's terrible that said employee got severly burned.......but alas you cannot fix stupid...........like I keep telling my 5 year old, i'm not being a big fat meanie.............the rules keep you safe. Period!


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


#6 The Food Scientist

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 02:45 PM

Have you spoken with any first aid companies? They usually provide you with food grade/food processing compliant kits to be installed in your production area.


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#7 00half

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 02:54 PM

Have you spoken with any first aid companies? They usually provide you with food grade/food processing compliant kits to be installed in your production area.

 

We do have a first aid kit supplier who does provide food grade products, but they aren't located on the machines.  They are relatively close by (within 10 seconds walking distance). However with burn injuries, we realize they are very time sensitive, so we were looking at supplying each machine with some burn cream provided it be in a special container to prevent any accidental spillage from occurring.



#8 The Food Scientist

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 02:58 PM

We do have a first aid kit supplier who does provide food grade products, but they aren't located on the machines.  They are relatively close by (within 10 seconds walking distance). However with burn injuries, we realize they are very time sensitive, so we were looking at supplying each machine with some burn cream provided it be in a special container to prevent any accidental spillage from occurring.

 

Hmm well I believe in that case you need to figure out and assess the safety of those machines. Because normally whenever an employee is injured, no matter what the injury is, they must stop working, move away and get aid, and make sure this injury will no pose a food safety risk. 


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#9 SQFconsultant

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 01:34 PM

Cold spray and related are only intended for minor burns, not major - you can actually do more harm and good for someone with major burns - I assume you have a procedure for escalation of a situation such as this that includes paramedics and training people what to do in the event of someone getitng burned.


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#10 larissaj

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 03:21 PM

I believe there needs to be a first aid log that gets verified that what was used and taken gets documented. So it would have name of employee, injury, what was needed, date, time. Also check the manufacture of said machine and see if there is any ways to extra protect it so that even employees who cant follow rules cant get hurt. Maybe have heat protection clothing available. Oven mits, sleeves, pants, etc. Make a procedure that requires that the heat protection clothing is required since the accident happened. 



#11 MsMars

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 04:07 PM

Is it just me, or is there an elephant in the room? If you have employees regularly obtaining burns that are so severe and time-sensitive that you need "cold-spray" or the like in the immediate vicinity, then you need:

1. Guarded equipment

2. Employee re-training and discipline for not following the rules (even if they are injured - that makes it an even more urgent situation). 

 

I've witnessed a situation that involved a sanitation worker amputating his own finger and getting canned in the same day. Rules are rules, and they're rules for a reason.



#12 kfromNE

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 04:15 PM

I believe there needs to be a first aid log that gets verified that what was used and taken gets documented. So it would have name of employee, injury, what was needed, date, time. Also check the manufacture of said machine and see if there is any ways to extra protect it so that even employees who cant follow rules cant get hurt. Maybe have heat protection clothing available. Oven mits, sleeves, pants, etc. Make a procedure that requires that the heat protection clothing is required since the accident happened. 

 

I believe it depends on the incident. In our first aid kit, there is tylenol, etc. so no we don't document what is taken. However if someone slipped and fell, got a major burn then yes a incident report would be written up though many times this falls under HR/OSHA/Workman's Comp. and not food safety.

 

I do agree with Ms. Mars - if this happens on a regular basis, a root cause analysis would need to be done by management.



#13 larissaj

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 04:19 PM

I believe it depends on the incident. In our first aid kit, there is tylenol, etc. so no we don't document what is taken. However if someone slipped and fell, got a major burn then yes a incident report would be written up though many times this falls under HR/OSHA/Workman's Comp. and not food safety.

 

I do agree with Ms. Mars - if this happens on a regular basis, a root cause analysis would need to be done by management.

 

 

They should log everything because what if an employee drops the Tylenol in the product? Which we never include pills in med kits for those reasons, what if someone was angry and put pills in the product? Those are all things that have been explained to me. Our med kits are in an office where someone is always in however in past companies pills were a touchy thing. 







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: burns, cold spray, food, grade, SQF, packaging, manufacturing, safety

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