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Raw materials evaluation roasted garlic puree


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bellablaz

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Posted 29 April 2019 - 11:30 PM

As I was performing my raw material evaluation on an ingredient , I noticed that my ingredient spec had no pH parameters. I thought this was strange and reached out to my supplier and they mentioned that, "this ingredient is not pH controlled and therefore a pH is not reported." The ingredient being evaluated is a roasted garlic puree and we also use a garlic puree from the same supplier that does include a pH value for a biological parameter. I cannot wrap my head around this and was looking for some guidance. The only evaluation that can be done in house would be just a sensory evaluation. I could send a sample of the puree for testing to obtain a pH but i do not having anything to reference it against from the supplier. Is this common?



Charles.C

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 01:58 AM

As I was performing my raw material evaluation on an ingredient , I noticed that my ingredient spec had no pH parameters. I thought this was strange and reached out to my supplier and they mentioned that, "this ingredient is not pH controlled and therefore a pH is not reported." The ingredient being evaluated is a roasted garlic puree and we also use a garlic puree from the same supplier that does include a pH value for a biological parameter. I cannot wrap my head around this and was looking for some guidance. The only evaluation that can be done in house would be just a sensory evaluation. I could send a sample of the puree for testing to obtain a pH but i do not having anything to reference it against from the supplier. Is this common?

 

Hi bellablaz,

 

I will respond in a safety context -

 

Here is a typical quote from a haccp plan development -

 

Task 2 - Describe the product

To start a hazard analysis, a full description of the product, including customer specification, should be prepared using a form such as that given in Appendix III. This should include information relevant to safety, e.g. mycotoxin regulation/target level, composition, physical/chemical properties of the raw materials and the final product, the amount of water available for microbial growth (aw), the amount of acid or alkali in the product (pH). Also information regarding how the product is to be packaged, stored and transported should also be considered together with facts regarding its' shelf life and recommended storage temperatures. Where appropriate, labelling information and an example of the label should be included. This information will help the HACCP team to identify 'real' hazards associated with the process.

 

http://www.fao.org/3...0e/y1390e0a.htm

 

And some possible safety-related reasons -

 

 

  1. Ingredients

    1. Does the food contain any sensitive ingredients that may present microbiological hazards (e.g., Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus); chemical hazards (e.g., aflatoxin, antibiotic or pesticide residues); or physical hazards (stones, glass, metal)?
    2. Are potable water, ice and steam used in formulating or in handling the food?
    3. What are the sources (e.g., geographical region, specific supplier)
  2. Intrinsic Factors - Physical characteristics and composition (e.g., pH, type of acidulants, fermentable carbohydrate, water activity, preservatives) of the food during and after processing.

    1. What hazards may result if the food composition is not controlled?
    2. Does the food permit survival or multiplication of pathogens and/or toxin formation in the food during processing?
    3. Will the food permit survival or multiplication of pathogens and/or toxin formation during subsequent steps in the food chain?
    4. Are there other similar products in the market place? What has been the safety record for these products? What hazards have been associated with the products?

 

https://www.fda.gov/...tion-guidelines

 

So yes, generically, pH should be included in a spec. And even more so from "B" above's  POV.

 

And with respect to roasted garlic puree, there may be a specific safety aspect, eg see this discussion -

 

https://www.chowhoun...d-garlic-775280

 

and

 

Attached File  garlic.PNG   12.6KB   0 downloads

Attached File  roasted garlic in oil.pdf   1.04MB   14 downloads

 

Regardless, many detailed garlic specs make no mention of pH -

 

Attached File  garlic_puree.pdf   639.64KB   12 downloads

 

 

 

 

 

  .


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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