Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

How are you preparing for African Swine Fever?

animal feed biosecurity african swine fever asf asfv

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 MsMars

MsMars

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 596 posts
  • 192 thanks
144
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female

Posted 31 May 2019 - 06:59 PM

For those in animal feed manufacturing in the US/Canada/Mexico - curious to know how are you preparing? What biosecurity measures do you have in place already, and what are you adding? Do you have a specific crisis management plan for this yet?

 

I am having flashbacks to avian influenza, but curious to see what others thoughts are and what measures you are taking.



#2 bmart

bmart

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 27 posts
  • 11 thanks
8
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 31 May 2019 - 08:26 PM

Not in the swine feed industry but following this because we use an ingredient that contains lard in milk replace manufacturing. My current plan surrounds looking into alternative ingredients that are not lard based since the price may skyrocket with a decreasing supply.

 

Generally, I am keeping an eye on what the AFIA has been putting out. They recently reported on holding time recommendations for raw materials which is helpful.



#3 MsMars

MsMars

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 596 posts
  • 192 thanks
144
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female

Posted 03 June 2019 - 01:46 PM

Have you read this? https://www.asi.k-st...SFV in Feed.pdf

Kansas State is disputing the Dee research a bit due to small sample size and limited study.  But really material holds are all that we've got against this so far (other than standard farm to farm/farm to mill biosecurity measures). That and warm weather - the virus seems to be heat intolerant. 

 

I've been throwing around the idea of quat granules at entrance and exits, but haven't found any research on whether or not these products are effective against ASFV. 



#4 bmart

bmart

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 27 posts
  • 11 thanks
8
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 03 June 2019 - 04:02 PM

Interesting read and assessment on the Dee study. 

 

This FAO link says that your best bet against ASFV would be alkalis, hypochlorites, etc. http://www.fao.org/3...0E/Y0660E03.htm

 

Are you importing grains or other foods from an impacted country? Where do you see the risk of ASFV coming from?

 

Based on the reading I think that a strong strong vendor approval program and FSVP will be your best bet for now. Once/if it hits the US then, yes, I would agree that some boot wash program should be implemented. Do you all already have a captive boot policy? 

 

Also, are you doing environmental swabs? Seems like you can keep an eye on Enterobacteriaceae, for general hygiene; granted it won't give you a definitive answer on what's present.



#5 MsMars

MsMars

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 596 posts
  • 192 thanks
144
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female

Posted 03 June 2019 - 07:22 PM

Interesting read and assessment on the Dee study. 

 

This FAO link says that your best bet against ASFV would be alkalis, hypochlorites, etc. http://www.fao.org/3...0E/Y0660E03.htm

 

Are you importing grains or other foods from an impacted country? Where do you see the risk of ASFV coming from?

 

Based on the reading I think that a strong strong vendor approval program and FSVP will be your best bet for now. Once/if it hits the US then, yes, I would agree that some boot wash program should be implemented. Do you all already have a captive boot policy? 

 

Also, are you doing environmental swabs? Seems like you can keep an eye on Enterobacteriaceae, for general hygiene; granted it won't give you a definitive answer on what's present.

 

We don't import any at-risk ingredients (or anything else) from impacted countries.  I do plan to have a conversation with our procurement team on where exactly we are getting our ingredients - I don't believe we have any risks there but just as a double check.

 

We are continually told that it is not a question of if, but when.  So the risk will primarily come from farm-to-farm contact (as we do not have any native wild suidae in our area that I'm aware of). We've used on-trailer spraying systems and granule mats in the past.  We do not have captive boot policy but do utilize disposable booties on-farm for at-risk customers and upon customer request - that will become mandatory for all farms if we experience an outbreak. 

 

I'm pondering a few things in regards to creating a ASFV crisis management plan: what kind of policy should we have in place for those employees who raise swine (there are A LOT), should we stop using swine-derived products (even if heat-treated?), should we go ahead and use the hold guidelines on all our at-risk ingredients? So many questions and not many answers. 

 

Hoping to take the easy way out and this just not becoming a reality!







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: animal feed, biosecurity, african swine fever, asf, asfv

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

EV SSL Certificate