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How long to keep SDS?

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larissaj

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:45 PM

Hello,

 

I have finally looked through the SDSs we have here at my company (I am QA manager who also over sees sanitation, been here since late march) and no one has touched the SDSs since 2012. Now last I heard we have to keep records of all chemicals that have been in the plant for 10 years, which is the excuse im being told as to why it hasnt been updated. We are a food manufacture by the way, not yet SQF certified and we have 5 allergens, very small company, anyways in my past we have saved all the chemicals however separated them with the new chemicals versus the ones we have had in the past. 

 

So my question is how long do we hold onto the old SDSs and how do you organize them. I think it will be easier to ask for new SDSs because all the ones I have are in the old MSDS format. And I want all the current SDS in the front versus just alphabetized order.



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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:51 PM

All of our clients hold these for the length of usage + 3 years.

 

And all of them also have them updated yearly, cause chemicals do change.

 

Organization wise - binder in ABC order - Most also post these at the chemical containtment area.


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KarrieC

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:53 PM

Had the same problem when my boss retired last year.  I categorized by dept.  Sanitation, maintenance, production.  Then I also separated those files into usage; ex. lubricants, adhesives, paint.  Makes it a lot faster to find the SDS you are asked to pull for an audit or emergency.  GET RID of all MSDS osha doesn't want to see those.  what about the information posted for employees?  is it up to date?  GHS?  Labels for secondary containers are hard to find.  I keep coming across the old style.  Had to make up my own.  Hope these examples help.  Attached File  Maintenance Chemicals.docx   31.49KB   22 downloadsAttached File  vinegar white ghs label.docx   20.49KB   18 downloads



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MsMars

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:54 PM

When I managed SDS books, I kept all expired SDSs in an archive file on site.  I only kept current SDSs in the books around the plant for employee access, and I checked for updated SDSs annually.

 

This was back when I unwillingly absorbed some employee safety items (because according to HR it's just like food safety, right?) so I couldn't tell you the exact retention, but 10 years does sound accurate (had something to do with worker's comp).



larissaj

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:54 PM

Do you think it would be bad if I started from scratch then? Like I stated, nothing has been done since 2012 and there are sheets from 2004, so If I get all the chemicals we currently use and just keep it updated from now on, would it look bad?



MsMars

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:56 PM

Do you think it would be bad if I started from scratch then? Like I stated, nothing has been done since 2012 and there are sheets from 2004, so If I get all the chemicals we currently use and just keep it updated from now on, would it look bad?

 

I don't see a problem in doing that as long as you keep the old SDS/MSDS you currently have in an archive. 



larissaj

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Posted 25 June 2019 - 06:59 PM

I don't see a problem in doing that as long as you keep the old SDS/MSDS you currently have in an archive. 

Ok I will do that, im confused why nothing has been updated for so long so more work for me. Yay! :/



Ryan M.

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 01:48 AM

You need to keep information on chemicals for 30 years.  Most companies keep the MSDS / SDS sheets for 30 years as that information.

 

What is really required is when you started using X chemical and if you stopped using it when did you stop.  Reason being is employee exposure and potential for long-term affects from their exposure to said chemical.  See the link below.

 

https://advancedsafe...ata-sheets-sds/

 

Every place I've been where I've managed the SDS / MSDS sheets I've always kept older copies / versions.  I think if you keep these records on a document register that's updated with dates you can probably not have to keep the SDS / MSDS sheet...maybe.



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larissaj

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 04:53 PM

You need to keep information on chemicals for 30 years.  Most companies keep the MSDS / SDS sheets for 30 years as that information.

 

What is really required is when you started using X chemical and if you stopped using it when did you stop.  Reason being is employee exposure and potential for long-term affects from their exposure to said chemical.  See the link below.

 

https://advancedsafe...ata-sheets-sds/

 

Every place I've been where I've managed the SDS / MSDS sheets I've always kept older copies / versions.  I think if you keep these records on a document register that's updated with dates you can probably not have to keep the SDS / MSDS sheet...maybe.

 

 

 

I wasnt even born 30 years ago LOL however I will save what we have and update everything. Thank you!



FoodSafetyPlanet

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 07:54 PM

Hi L,

Based on everything you’ve said, I would start from scratch.

Keep old versions onsite but not in the main SDS book.
I also recommend saving an electronic version.



mgourley

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Posted 26 June 2019 - 08:24 PM

Back when I was doing Occupational Safety, MSDS's  for chemicals were required to be maintained for 30 years.

 

Marshal



Mulan1010

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Posted 02 July 2019 - 10:54 PM

I was always told 30 years too but decided to look it up myself and see what the rules are.  The link below has some good information:

https://www.msdsonli...s-for-30-years/



Ryan M.

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 12:27 AM

I was always told 30 years too but decided to look it up myself and see what the rules are.  The link below has some good information:

https://www.msdsonli...s-for-30-years/

 

True, holding onto MSDS is not required, But.....so many places just hold onto the MSDS / SDS sheets as it is an easy way to keep that information.

 

"Again, if you do not keep the MSDS, then what ever record you do keep must include information about ‘where’ and ‘when’ the chemical or substance was used."



Hoosiersmoker

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Posted 09 July 2019 - 03:41 PM

The GHS (OSHA HAZCOM 2012) requires all MSDS and SDS to be retained for 30 years from the last date of use. We keep an archive file cabinet for this. As a packaging manufacturer, almost all of our raw materials require an SDS. If no SDS is available, the MSDS must be kept. All manufacturing facilities should already have converted to the GHS system.



CMHeywood

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 02:26 PM

If you have MSDS then they are probably outdated.  The new format is called SDS.

 

The retention period of 10 years or whatever is not really related to whether you need to updated your SDS.  It is mainly related to having documents for any chemicals that you may no longer be using but someone was exposed in the past and is now complaining about health issues.



Hoosiersmoker

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Posted 10 July 2019 - 04:02 PM

My previous post was stated from memory of past Safety Manager positions decades ago. The old requirement was to keep MSDS (and / or SDS) for 30 years. The clarification from 2010 requires information on health hazards as a result of the use of a chemical be retained for no less than 30 years as well as when and where it was used. I will still keep the SDS and / or MSDS for 30 years as all of the pertinent chemical hazard information is already there and all I have to do is move them from a book to a file cabinet - Done.






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