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Suggestions for Reusable Measuring Utensils for honey/glucose

Honey measuring tool Utensil glucose chemical hazard

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Vee_

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 03:52 AM

Hello everyone,

 

I wanted to know if any one would have any suggestions for a problem at our facility. I work for a nut processing facility where we create honey coated nuts by producing them in small batches  in copper kettles. For the longest time we were measuring the honey/glucose using disposal containers where after one use they would be disposed of.

 

We recently had a major customer do a tour of the facility and deemed the plastic containers a non-conformance as it is a potential chemical hazard. They wanted us to switch to reusable, measurable containers. The issue is the actual measuring of the honey/glusose. They honey has a tendency to stick to the measuring cup. As well, actually measuring the honey out of the big container is awkward.  This is an issue because the kettle operators literally have a minute to add the honey/glucose before the batch burns. They can't stand there waiting for the honey to pour out. 

 

Also, the measuring cups are just leaving a mess behind. 

 

Any suggestions would be welcome.



LesleySR

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 07:08 AM

Hi there Vee

 

I guess it depends on the volume you need to add to each batch?....

 

Take your point on the viscosity of honey - I used to work at a honey packing site, sugar based substances are very difficult to work with at room or lower temperatures, most of the places I have worked at that handle these substances tend to apply some heat to reduce viscosity and make the handling easier & improve yield.

 

Maybe a prewarmed stainless steel jug might help depending on volumes you are adding?....

 

Alternatively - depending on the volume you need to add per batch, you could consider  a pump that fits onto the thread of the barrel/drum & prewarm the barrel/drum before use?...

 

https://www.alibaba....nsfer-pump.html

 

Your employer might consider this costly but you may be able to make a case based on annual cost of the containers, honey yield for drums, operator time & possibly historical data for batches that have burnt & had to be disposed of?...

 

Best of luck with this & hope you manage to find a decent solution



SQFconsultant

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Posted 28 June 2019 - 12:50 PM

You said:

We recently had a major customer do a tour of the facility and deemed the plastic containers a non-conformance as it is a potential chemical hazard.

 

A. Was this the customer or an actual Auditor following an audit format?

B. What is the non-conformance based on? Or was it pulled out of their left field?

C. Have you done a risk-analysis for using what you have been using all this time?

 

And D. What exactly did they indicate was the "potential chemical hazard."?

 

Before you get involved with going to alternatives that may not be a good fit - look at these first.

 

The word "potential" means nothing if there is no basis for the call out.  


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Glenn Oster
 
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Sharon (Dewsbury)

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 09:28 AM

With viscous liquids we  add by weight difference.

Weigh the reusable vessel with the honey in.

Pour the approximate amount in and re-weigh the vessel.

Calculate by difference the amount that's actually been added. If you overshoot you can always add extra nuts to bring back the ratio







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