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Does anyone know how to test culinary steam for purity?

Culinary Steam

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#1 dsafforld

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 05:23 PM

During a past SQF Audit( Food Safety Code Edition 8.0) an auditor asked if i tested culinary steam for purity. Does anyone know how to test culinary steam for purity?



#2 Sweet'n'low

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 07:24 PM

If you are using steam as a means of cooking or blanching, it might be an issue if it's contaminated. Could you elaborate more on how steam is used in your plant? That way we could provide more insight on how to help you out. 



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#3 The Food Scientist

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Posted 03 July 2019 - 08:15 PM

I believe it is treated in the same manner as compressed air under "Air Quality" section in SQF 8.  


Edited by The Food Scientist, 03 July 2019 - 08:20 PM.

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#4 SQFconsultant

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Posted 04 July 2019 - 03:14 AM

Steam is required to be tested for purity. The test medium is similar to that used for inline compressed air testing.


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#5 mahantesh.micro

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Posted 04 July 2019 - 04:35 AM

In my previous organization we use to collect steam condensate and send to external lab for analysis for heavy metals and microbial load.



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#6 dsafforld

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Posted 05 July 2019 - 01:47 PM

If you are using steam as a means of cooking or blanching, it might be an issue if it's contaminated. Could you elaborate more on how steam is used in your plant? That way we could provide more insight on how to help you out. 

We inject steam into our product through a steam auger in order to increase the moisture



#7 larbi

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Posted 05 July 2019 - 03:08 PM

Waters used to produce steam are sometimes added with chemicals to avoid rust and calcium chlorid deposite in boilers. Some products are not food grade. One need to know how this steam was prepared and what chemicals were added.



#8 Jeffrey Ort

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Posted 05 July 2019 - 05:47 PM

Water boilers treated with chemicals may have a critical limit for residue in the steam, collecting condensate can be tested for residual chemicals of concern.

FDA guidelines

https://www.accessda....cfm?FR=173.310



#9 Ryan M.

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 05:40 AM

A facility I was in used culinary steam and we tested the condensate for appropriate chemical levels (boiler treatment chemicals). 

 

We also used steam filters rated to 0.95% efficient at 2 microns or larger and these filters were sent out for physical inspection and micro testing whenever they were changed out.  We changed the filters based on number of uses, filters were used in "batches" and our PLC system kept track of the number of batches and locked operators out of equipment once it reached a certain number.  It was a neat setup.  Not many people would think of this...but my former facility director did and I'm glad he did.






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