Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Partially Processed Ingredient Hold Time


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

674674

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 12 posts
  • 1 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 23 July 2019 - 04:16 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I need your expertise on one topic.

 

We use roasting and toasting as a step to enhance the flavor of the certain ingredients, it is not the kill step since we cook the product once all the ingredients are mixed.

 

How long can we keep an ingredient at ambient temperature that has been partially heat treated by roasting/toasting? Spores are primary concerns. The ingredients will be cooked in subsequent step.

 

All the resources I found are referencing 'fully cooked product" and I need it for partially processed ingredient(s) that will go through the kill step.

 

Thank you so much!!

 

 



The Food Scientist

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,040 posts
  • 264 thanks
201
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Food Science, Nature, SQF, Learning, Trying out new foods, Sarcasm.

Posted 23 July 2019 - 05:28 PM

What are these ingredients that you are roasting and toasting? Are they nuts? 


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


Thanked by 1 Member:

Scampi

    Fellow

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,911 posts
  • 1063 thanks
738
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 23 July 2019 - 05:43 PM

The only way you'll know is to run an accelerated shelf life on your partially processed ingredients. Then work that into your existing program as a "use by" date once roasted/toasted

Nuts and seeds sometimes go rancid really quick once exposed to any heat, so have rancidity testing performed as well


Edited by Scampi, 23 July 2019 - 05:43 PM.

Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


Thanked by 1 Member:

674674

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 12 posts
  • 1 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 23 July 2019 - 06:18 PM

We roast fresh/dry produce. Seeds I'm not concerned as we use them right away.

 

During the audit it came up - even though we don't consider it a kill step heat treatment the auditor was concerned about spore formers.

 

Roasting/blanching is where she had an issue, I have to include it in the hazard analysis but I need resource to back up the time that I put as ambient temperature hold limit.

 

She had something like 2 hours but I can't find anything to support it. 



Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 18,985 posts
  • 5285 thanks
1,256
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 24 July 2019 - 12:37 AM

We roast fresh/dry produce. Seeds I'm not concerned as we use them right away.

 

During the audit it came up - even though we don't consider it a kill step heat treatment the auditor was concerned about spore formers.

 

Roasting/blanching is where she had an issue, I have to include it in the hazard analysis but I need resource to back up the time that I put as ambient temperature hold limit.

 

She had something like 2 hours but I can't find anything to support it. 

 

I daresay yr auditor was thinking about analogies to spore germination time, eg  in processes like rice cooking / baking products which are potentially vulnerable to slow cooling due B.cereus (et al.) spores.

(an analogous effect occurs for vegetative species where the max. cooling time after cooking is estimated via calculated bacterial generation times of appropriate pathogens)

 

There is a lot of classic/non-classic  material on above topics on internet, ie google. (+ this forum).

 

for example -

 

Attached File  chilling rate cooked rice.pdf   329.42KB   13 downloads


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


moskito

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 403 posts
  • 81 thanks
19
Good

  • Germany
    Germany
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 July 2019 - 04:11 PM

Hi,

 

I think any answer is very dependent on the specific product, the "physical condition" and the storage conditions. Only with these informations an assessment is possible - product specific. Once you have these informations cross checks with worst case products would be helpfull (accellerated tests).

 

Rgds

 

moskito






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users