Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Is there a CCP in producing plastic packaging?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Cherry11

Cherry11

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 3 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Philippines
    Philippines

Posted 23 December 2019 - 05:30 AM

Can someone share if what are the CCP's they encountered in their HACCP Plan for a plastic packaging?

 

Here is the process we do:

 

Extrusion

Printing

Lamination
Slitting

Bagmaking

 



#2 Simon

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,338 posts
  • 1298 thanks
607
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 23 December 2019 - 11:29 AM

Hi Cherry11, this has been a long standing debate on the forums with most agreeing that in general CCP's do not exist in food packaging in the classic Codex HACCP system.  Rarely if you use water or air in direct contact with the food packaging during manufacture then that could be a CCP and also some people choose to class the hazard of "mixing printed designs" as a CCP as it is so serious because it could result in death.  For example a chocolate packaging ending up on a nut product because of a mix up in the packaging manufacture.  The key point is that you have adequate controls to prevent all potential hazards, not whether it is called a CCP or not.  Although naming a CCP can help to elevate a serious hazard and the related controls for staff awareness.

 

Hope this makes sense.

 

By the way see this topic for further discussion on this issue:

https://www.ifsqn.co...aging-processes

 

Regards,
Simon


hand-pointing-down.gif
 
Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 140 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html

 

recommend-us-on-facebook.png


Thanked by 2 Members:

#3 kfromNE

kfromNE

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 389 posts
  • 141 thanks
96
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Bicycling, reading, nutrition, trivia

Posted 23 December 2019 - 07:37 PM

:off_topic:  Simon - that is a great picture of you. :x_biggrin: :santa: :x_tongue:


Edited by kfromNE, 23 December 2019 - 07:37 PM.


#4 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4863 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 26 December 2019 - 02:32 AM

Hi Cherry11, this has been a long standing debate on the forums with most agreeing that in general CCP's do not exist in food packaging in the classic Codex HACCP system.  Rarely if you use water or air in direct contact with the food packaging during manufacture then that could be a CCP and also some people choose to class the hazard of "mixing printed designs" as a CCP as it is so serious because it could result in death.  For example a chocolate packaging ending up on a nut product because of a mix up in the packaging manufacture.  The key point is that you have adequate controls to prevent all potential hazards, not whether it is called a CCP or not.  Although naming a CCP can help to elevate a serious hazard and the related controls for staff awareness.

 

Hope this makes sense.

 

By the way see this topic for further discussion on this issue:

https://www.ifsqn.co...aging-processes

 

Regards,
Simon

 

Just to comment that, despite the above thread's age (2005), it contains some beautifully apt comments on haccp plans in general which are still entirely relevant. :thumbup:

 

From a Packaging POV the website linked in post below, I think, remains a relative haccp rarity -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...rd/#entry153259

 

I do recall that there are a (very) few "fairly" current (submitted) Packaging haccp plans on this Forum but they may be hard to find.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 CMHeywood

CMHeywood

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 452 posts
  • 115 thanks
37
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Neenah, Wisconsin

Posted 07 January 2020 - 05:22 PM

I work for a company that makes food contact packaging.  Per Simon's comment, we used the Codex HACCP flowchart and did not identify any CCP's.

 

A CCP is often used when there normally will be a source of contamination that is removed or reduced at a particular point in the manufacturing process.  An example that is often cited is pasteurizing raw milk since it has a very high chance of being contaminated with bacteria.

 

Calling a control a CCP usually would involve:

(1)  Showing data that you control removes or reduces that contamination to an acceptable level.

(2)  Recording control conditions (such as temperature) at adequate intervals to show you are monitoring.

(3)  Show calibration records for any test or monitoring equipment that is used in the control.

 

These three requirements are usually difficult to implement when your monitoring is based on visual inspection only.



#6 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4863 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 07 January 2020 - 11:39 PM

I work for a company that makes food contact packaging.  Per Simon's comment, we used the Codex HACCP flowchart and did not identify any CCP's.

 

A CCP is often used when there normally will be a source of contamination that is removed or reduced at a particular point in the manufacturing process.  An example that is often cited is pasteurizing raw milk since it has a very high chance of being contaminated with bacteria.

 

Calling a control a CCP usually would involve:

(1)  Showing data that you control removes or reduces that contamination to an acceptable level.

(2)  Recording control conditions (such as temperature) at adequate intervals to show you are monitoring.

(3)  Show calibration records for any test or monitoring equipment that is used in the control.

 

These three requirements are usually difficult to implement when your monitoring is based on visual inspection only.

 

Incomplete.

a CCP is not a "control".

 

eg -

 

CCP: Critical Control Point - A step at which control can be applied and is essential to prevent or eliminate a food safety hazard or reduce it to an acceptable level.

https://www.iopp.org...cfm?pageid=2267

(I often remember the acronym PERHAL)


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users