Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

FDA Ready To Eat Declaration Requirements

labelling fda

Best Answer Ryan M., 08 April 2020 - 01:26 PM

The only real requirement for RTE foods is to ensure that food does not cause injury or make the consumer (take care in defining your consumers) sick, or potentially kill them.  Beyond that, it is up to the manufacturer ensure this and prove this in their documents and records.

Go to the full post


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 andregu

andregu

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 3 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Mexico
    Mexico

Posted 07 April 2020 - 06:46 PM

Hello, 

 

I've been trying to find some requirements or guidelines that state how to declare a ready to eat product and what entails a ready to eat product, i've read some guides and FDA definitions,  but i don't undestand them or find them very vague, is there a helpfull soul that can assit me in undertanding this more easily,

 

Thank you in advance and sorry for my bad english, This is my first time writing in a forum!



#2 kick

kick

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 31 posts
  • 4 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 07 April 2020 - 06:54 PM

Ready-to-eat food (RTE food) means any food that is normally eaten in its raw state or any other food, including a processed food, for which it is reasonably foreseeable that the food will be eaten without further processing that would significantly minimize biological hazards.

Sent from my motorola one power using Tapatalk



Thanked by 1 Member:

#3 andregu

andregu

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 3 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Mexico
    Mexico

Posted 07 April 2020 - 07:46 PM

Thank you for your reply !

 

I have another question,

 

where can I see what  ..."reasonably foreseeable that the food will be eaten without further processing"... entails? Is there a list or guide of the products that can be pass as RTE?

 

Thanks in advance  ^_^



#4 The Food Scientist

The Food Scientist

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 929 posts
  • 242 thanks
180
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Food Science, Nature, SQF, Learning, Trying out new foods, Sarcasm.

Posted 08 April 2020 - 01:21 PM

Think of it as a food you just open and eat without any further processing like cooking for instance. Canned meats & veggies, Deli meats, bakery products, certain snacks, candies, RTE prepared meals...etc


Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


#5 Ryan M.

Ryan M.

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,007 posts
  • 388 thanks
177
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Birmingham, AL
  • Interests:Reading, crosswords, passionate discussions, laughing at US politics.

Posted 08 April 2020 - 01:26 PM   Best Answer

The only real requirement for RTE foods is to ensure that food does not cause injury or make the consumer (take care in defining your consumers) sick, or potentially kill them.  Beyond that, it is up to the manufacturer ensure this and prove this in their documents and records.



Thanked by 1 Member:

#6 Fishlady

Fishlady

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 141 posts
  • 40 thanks
12
Good

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female

Posted 13 April 2020 - 04:07 AM

The phrase “reasonably foreseeable that the food will be eaten without further processing” is the key. This phrase applies to almost any food - frozen peas (people thaw them and use in a salad without cooking), cookie dough (how many people eat it raw?), etc. Consider how a consumer could use your product without cooking it, and somebody probably will. I heard one ex-FDA official use the example of someone who had blogged about using raw French fries as a teething remedy for her baby!



#7 Miri

Miri

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 32 posts
  • 8 thanks
6
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Vulcan

Posted 17 April 2020 - 01:06 PM

A lot of people think RTE is strictly for retail products, but it can be for ingredients, too.  If your product does not require additional processing to reduce hazards (e.g. microbiological, physical, etc.) it could be considered RTE.  You have to decide for yourself.







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users