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Risk assessment for slow-building toxins like lead and mycotoxins

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Zatarra

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 02:59 PM

Doing a risk assessment for something like a foreign object or salmonella feels straightforward because there's a clear result from consuming it one time. For toxins lead or mycotoxins, however, it seems less intuitive because you'd have to consume them over time for adverse effects to appear. The same could be said for carcinogens.

 

Any insights on how to run toxins with slow-building effects through a risk matrix?



olenazh

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 03:06 PM

It's potentially dangerous substances, so you should assess them as others.



pHruit

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 03:36 PM

The FDA appears to have set "action limits" for some of these, e.g.:

https://www.fda.gov/...and-animal-feed

https://www.fda.gov/...-products-human

 

I'm less familiar with the FDA/US, but if it's general reference on an approach to assessments then the EU's assessments might be useful - all of their dietary intake/risk assessments for these are freely available online - just google "EFSA risk assessment <toxin name>" and you'll easily find them.

e.g. Patulin: https://ec.europa.eu...ogue/patulin_en

Aflatoxins: https://www.efsa.eur...ournal/pub/6040



MsMars

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 03:37 PM

They should be assessed like any other risk- and if your intended consumer is an animal, the risk will be slightly higher. 



olenazh

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 03:41 PM

They should be assessed like any other risk- and if your intended consumer is an animal, the risk will be slightly higher. 

Interesting: why is it higher for animals? Logically, it should be lower due to stronger stomach acids...



MsMars

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Posted 22 July 2020 - 03:43 PM

Interesting: why is it higher for animals? Logically, it should be lower due to stronger stomach acids...

 

Some animals are more directly affected by certain mycotoxins, especially young and gestating animals. 



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