Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Time control to reach -18C for chilled foods

Food safety talk HACCP FREEZING

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Foodprep

Foodprep

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 16 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Canada
    Canada

Posted 03 September 2020 - 07:45 PM

Hello Experts, 

 

Quick Question- I am developing SOP under PRP for Freezing Chilled soups. Our temperature goal is to reach -18C however, I am not able to find a criteria for time. Freezing is to extend our shelf life so, we would freeze soups rapidly in our blast freezer but I am wondering if I need to meet a minimum time requirement such as for chilling foods? Would it be appropriate to say that chilled foods drop continuously in temperature until it reaches -18C? 

 

Thanks,



#2 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4864 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 03 September 2020 - 09:10 PM

Hello Experts, 

 

Quick Question- I am developing SOP under PRP for Freezing Chilled soups. Our temperature goal is to reach -18C however, I am not able to find a criteria for time. Freezing is to extend our shelf life so, we would freeze soups rapidly in our blast freezer but I am wondering if I need to meet a minimum time requirement such as for chilling foods? Would it be appropriate to say that chilled foods drop continuously in temperature until it reaches -18C? 

 

Thanks,

 

Hi foodprep,

 

It may depend on what kind of soup and perhaps whether RTE or NRTE  but there are usually Regulatory requirements related to this topic.

 

Why freeze a chilled soup ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Foodprep

Foodprep

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 16 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Canada
    Canada

Posted 03 September 2020 - 09:27 PM

Hi foodprep,

 

It may depend on what kind of soup and perhaps whether RTE or NRTE  but there are usually Regulatory requirements related to this topic.

 

Why freeze a chilled soup ?

RTE, I can't seem to find it  :unsure:

To extend the shelf life. We have a new client who wants to sell it frozen. They want to hold it longer in their inventory. 



#4 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4864 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 03 September 2020 - 10:07 PM

RTE, I can't seem to find it  :unsure:

To extend the shelf life. We have a new client who wants to sell it frozen. They want to hold it longer in their inventory. 

 

RTE = ready-to-eat.

 

There is a lengthy, recent Canadian thread here on chilled/frozen soups.

 

There are potentially controversial elements involved, notably the labelling/commercialisation of RTE/NRTE products. (unrelated to yr current OP).

 

I think you will find that Health Canada specify cooling times but their website IMEX is a maze.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 Leila Burin

Leila Burin

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 111 posts
  • 36 thanks
12
Good

  • Spain
    Spain

Posted 13 September 2020 - 01:17 PM

Hello,

I suggest to do predictive microbiology to set the time: i.e: with https://www.combase.cc/index.php/es/

 

best regards,

Leila



#6 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4864 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 14 September 2020 - 03:34 AM

hi foodprep,

 

Were you able to locate any official requirements ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 Foodprep

Foodprep

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 16 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Canada
    Canada

Posted 17 September 2020 - 05:33 PM

hi foodprep,

 

Were you able to locate any official requirements ?

Nope! I was told that there are no regulatory requirements for freezing so we must come up with our own safe limit. 



#8 MichaelD

MichaelD

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 5 posts
  • 0 thanks
1
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 17 September 2020 - 07:00 PM

Hi,

Not sure about regulatory requirements; however, one of UK's retailers COP says that:

  • Freezing should start within 12h from packing
  • reach below -18C within 12h from start of freezing 

Which IMO makes sense, products should be frozen as soon as practically possible as you want to preserve that hopefully low micro of you product.



#9 Foodprep

Foodprep

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 16 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Canada
    Canada

Posted 13 October 2020 - 08:21 PM

Thanks, Michael. 

Hi,

Not sure about regulatory requirements; however, one of UK's retailers COP says that:

  • Freezing should start within 12h from packing
  • reach below -18C within 12h from start of freezing 

Which IMO makes sense, products should be frozen as soon as practically possible as you want to preserve that hopefully low micro of you product.



#10 Foodprep

Foodprep

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 16 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Canada
    Canada

Posted 13 October 2020 - 08:24 PM

Thanks, Michael. 

Is it possible to provide the link of this information. I will keep it for my records. 



#11 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4864 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 14 October 2020 - 07:07 AM

Parallel thread, this is UK "answer" (different to Post 9) followed by India. -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...sh/#entry165840

 

PS - 12 hours sounds "improbable" unless perhaps whole carcasses are involved.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#12 trubertq

trubertq

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 653 posts
  • 269 thanks
129
Excellent

  • Ireland
    Ireland
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Donegal

Posted 14 October 2020 - 10:52 AM

Depends on how the product is packed. 20 kg blocks of fish can take that long to reach -18°C in a blast freezer.

 

If the product is being run through a tunnel freezer or some other system it probably won't take as long. 

 

The Chilled Food Association had good guidelines for this. 

 

https://www.chilledf...-chilled-foods/


I'm entitled to my opinion, even a stopped clock is right twice a day

#13 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4864 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 14 October 2020 - 01:22 PM

Depends on how the product is packed. 20 kg blocks of fish can take that long to reach -18°C in a blast freezer.

 

If the product is being run through a tunnel freezer or some other system it probably won't take as long. 

 

The Chilled Food Association had good guidelines for this. 

 

https://www.chilledf...-chilled-foods/

Link appears to need 100 GBP.

 

Yes, freezing time depends intimately on thickness. And horsepower. And loading. And leakage. :smile:

 

For comparison, a plate freezer will do a standard 7kg fish fillet block in 2 hours. Blasters are certainly more amenable to overloading though.

 

PS - Some of the free stuff in yr link is useful. Thks.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users