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Testing needed on expired ingredients to determine if they are fit for use?


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#1 User_Undefined

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 04:13 PM

For expired raw materials for dietary supplements (i.e. powdered minerals/vitamins/botanicals), what kind of retesting is needed on expired or nearly expired ingredients to determine if they're still fit for use? Would this just be an assay? Would all tests listed on a CofA need to be verified? 



#2 olenazh

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 04:28 PM

Test for organoleptic and your regular micro (I would include Y&M as their growth is a sign of spoilage) - and put in down on BB Extension COA



#3 Ryan M.

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Posted 30 September 2020 - 09:50 PM

I would ask the supplier.  On factor is vitamin potency can change over time.  Another factor is the organoleptic properties of botanicals change over time as well.



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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 05:25 AM

For expired raw materials for dietary supplements (i.e. powdered minerals/vitamins/botanicals), what kind of retesting is needed on expired or nearly expired ingredients to determine if they're still fit for use? Would this just be an assay? Would all tests listed on a CofA need to be verified? 

 

 

For expired raw materials for dietary supplements (i.e. powdered minerals/vitamins/botanicals), what kind of retesting is needed on expired or nearly expired ingredients to determine if they're still fit for use? Would this just be an assay? Would all tests listed on a CofA need to be verified? 

Do you not trust the labelling ?


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Charles.C


#5 User_Undefined

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 04:13 PM

Do you not trust the labelling ?

 

I do, but ownership doesn't want to toss materials if it's possible to extend the expiration or retest dates. 



#6 MDaleDDF

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 05:17 PM

Am I missing something?  I've never heard of someone giving themselves a shelf life extension.  Would that not need to come from the supplier?    Testing it for safety doesn't mean it's still effective.
 

I can test my raw ingredients to show they're food safe, but I don't see my inspector letting that fly if the supplier doesn't give me a shelf life variance....



#7 Ryan M.

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Posted 01 October 2020 - 08:49 PM

I again suggest check with your supplier.  They can provide you with some ways to evaluate.  I will also say, in a previous life, we've sent samples of raw materials to suppliers for shelf-life evaluation and possible extension.  In this same company some of our customers did the same with products (they were ingredients in other foods) they used from us.



#8 pHruit

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Posted 02 October 2020 - 07:50 AM

Am I missing something?  I've never heard of someone giving themselves a shelf life extension.  Would that not need to come from the supplier?    Testing it for safety doesn't mean it's still effective.
 

I can test my raw ingredients to show they're food safe, but I don't see my inspector letting that fly if the supplier doesn't give me a shelf life variance....

In a previous role I've done this quite a lot of times, albeit for materials with life limited by quality rather than safety - I don't really see a problem with it as long as the basis of the extension can be justified, i.e. the limiting factor(s) for shelf life are well understood, there is a competent system to assess the current status of these characteristics against specification etc.

I've also found that for some types of raw material, suppliers will issue a "partial" extension subject to the customer checking x/y/z, and indeed have issued similar extensions for my customers too.

 

Ref. the OP's question, I'll also join the chorus of "ask your supplier" - they may be able to check a retained sample, they may be able to analyse a sample of your stock, and if nothing else they should at least be able to confirm what to look for and how to test for ongoing suitability (or possibly confirm that extension isn't sensible for those ingredients, but you're hoping it's not that one as it can often lead to something of a debate with purchasing etc as to the cost of throwing things away...).



#9 moskito

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Posted 02 October 2020 - 03:25 PM

Hi,

 

you have to demonstrate that the supplier specification is still met. Which parameters to be fulfilled is depend on your risk assessment, because you have to include the shelf-life of your product.

We have some requirements e.g. that raw materials must have a minimum redidual shelf-life delivered to us. In some other cases we asked for delivering e.g. max 14 days after production (dependent on the product).

For a few raw materials we have reduced the internal shelf-life compared to that given by the supplier.

For another few raw materials we have specs in place for "end of shelf life".

 

So, it depends.....

 

Rgds

moskito






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