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Can less weight in a raw material be classified as food fraud?

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Adistiyaika

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Posted 04 November 2020 - 03:53 AM

Hi all, 

I was wondering, can less weight in raw material classified as food fraud ?

 

food fraud vulnerability assessment is just for food safety issue or not?

 

thanks



Charles.C

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Posted 04 November 2020 - 04:10 AM

Hi all, 

I was wondering, can less weight in raw material classified as food fraud ?

 

food fraud vulnerability assessment is just for food safety issue or not?

 

thanks

 BRC definition -

 

Food fraud - Fraudulent and intentional substitution, dilution or addition to a product or raw material, or misrepresentation of the product or material, for the purpose of financial gain, by increasing the apparent value of the product or reducing the cost of its production.

 

 

 

So it depends on what you mean by "less weight"


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


SQFconsultant

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Posted 04 November 2020 - 02:00 PM

The short answer is YES.


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SQFconsultant

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Posted 04 November 2020 - 02:42 PM

My apologies, I meant to add to what I wrote but I hit the post button on my phone too quick.

 

Short weight of product from a supplier or from the producer to market could fall under food fraud.

 

Normally the fraud is done from an economic standpoint (for gain) or from a malicious standpoint to hurt a competitor (for instance.) etc.


All the Best,

 

All Rights Reserved,

Without Prejudice,

Glenn Oster.

CONSULTANT

 

https://glennoster.website3.me/

 

https://t.me/MVIDigitalWarrior

 

 

 


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The Food Scientist

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Posted 04 November 2020 - 03:06 PM

Imagine your customer takes that product and weighs out your raw material? Does a break down of ingredients? Because it happens a LOT and companies usually get sued. So what about that? Claiming something and doing something else is fraud.

 

Your weight of raw material is all reflected on your Nutrition facts label...

 

So in short. YES

 

Edit: Unless you mean raw material received from supplier like SQF consultant mentioned?


Edited by The Food Scientist, 04 November 2020 - 03:07 PM.

Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


moskito

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Posted 06 November 2020 - 04:34 PM

Hi,

 

I understand that you receive e.g. bags of milk powder which are filled with less milk powder as mentioned on the pack, e.g, with 24 kg instead of 25 kg. Then it can be IMO "simple fraud" under regular trade law, not food fraud (raw material not fraudulent or intentionally modified by substitution, dilution).

 

Rgds

moskito



Adistiyaika

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Posted 08 November 2020 - 05:09 AM

 BRC definition -

 

 

So it depends on what you mean by "less weight"

 for example, corn syrup in label state 100kg but when we do some check it just 95kg. 

the fraud is not food safety or quality issue. 

 

is it still food fraud? 



Adistiyaika

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Posted 08 November 2020 - 05:11 AM

My apologies, I meant to add to what I wrote but I hit the post button on my phone too quick.

 

Short weight of product from a supplier or from the producer to market could fall under food fraud.

 

Normally the fraud is done from an economic standpoint (for gain) or from a malicious standpoint to hurt a competitor (for instance.) etc.

so, do you mean it's still food fraud even it just the weight of the raw material? not food safety or quality issue.

for example i got the corn syrup with label state 100kg but when we do some check it just 95kg. 

really appreciate ur opinion 



Adistiyaika

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Posted 08 November 2020 - 05:13 AM

Hi,

 

I understand that you receive e.g. bags of milk powder which are filled with less milk powder as mentioned on the pack, e.g, with 24 kg instead of 25 kg. Then it can be IMO "simple fraud" under regular trade law, not food fraud (raw material not fraudulent or intentionally modified by substitution, dilution).

 

Rgds

moskito

yeah, i know what you mean. i still considering the cases just fraud not food fraud . 

from what i know food fraud cases just like substitution, mislabeling, dilutin etc . 

then you rather choos as a fraud not food fraud that we know, right?

 

anw, thanks for ur opinion



moskito

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Posted 08 November 2020 - 09:03 AM

yeah, i know what you mean. i still considering the cases just fraud not food fraud . 

from what i know food fraud cases just like substitution, mislabeling, dilutin etc . 

then you rather choos as a fraud not food fraud that we know, right?

 

anw, thanks for ur opinion

 

Yes, that is my understanding. Otherwise everything related to food becomes food fraud. That can not be the intention.

 

Rgds

moskito



Adistiyaika

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Posted 08 November 2020 - 12:26 PM

Imagine your customer takes that product and weighs out your raw material? Does a break down of ingredients? Because it happens a LOT and companies usually get sued. So what about that? Claiming something and doing something else is fraud.

 

Your weight of raw material is all reflected on your Nutrition facts label...

 

So in short. YES

 

Edit: Unless you mean raw material received from supplier like SQF consultant mentioned?

what if it just less weight? not break down of the raw material. for example, i got less weight/quantity of corn syrup . they labeled as 100kg but the actual just less than 100kg. 

 

I mean from what i know the example of food frauds are substitution, mislabeling, dilution etc. 



Charles.C

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Posted 09 November 2020 - 06:11 AM

There is "Fraud".

 

Then there is "Food Fraud", etc, etc

 

eg -

Attached File  Food Fraud and related terminologies.pdf   356.81KB   18 downloads

 

Here is an interpretation of the EU's viewpoint (European legislation apparently has no specific definition of food fraud) -

 

Article 16 states “labelling, advertising and presentation of food and feed shall not mislead the
consumers”. Food labels are the only source of food information for consumers when deciding
to  purchase  food  and  food  products;  choices  are  based  either  in  the  individual  tastes,  the
nutritional value of the food, the characteristics of certain food or ingredient, the necessities of
certain life stage, the health or nutritional claims in the labels, certain medical conditions, etc..
The presentation of the product should not mislead consumers, it should not create a false
impression  or  false  attributes  to  the  food.  Some  examples  of  fraudulent  labelling  are:
misrepresentation of net content or weight, stating different country of origin, labelling inferior
or  low  quality  ingredients  as  superior  ones,  listing  ingredients  that  are  absent,  omitting
ingredients, labelling different animal species, labelling food as ‘organic’ when it is not, claiming
false  beneficial  effects,  modifying  of  the  ‘use  by’  or  ‘best  before’  dates  or  providing  false
information  about  the  manufacturer.
  Consumers  cannot  determine  if  the  information  in  the
labels is true or false, normally consumers do not weight the content of a pre-packaged food
by fully trusting in what it is stated in the labels; if a food label is misleading in certain way or
there is any ingredient that is not listed, the only way consumers could notice is when getting
ill after consuming it or maybe, they would never notice.

 

Attached File  from food to fraud.pdf   728.99KB   20 downloads

 

This is GFSI food fraud -

 

Attached File  GFSI food fraud.PNG   413.25KB   1 downloads

 

And here is an interpretation of Grey market -

 

Attached File  Grey Market.jpg   165.73KB   1 downloads


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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