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CCP

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MazidM

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Posted 02 November 2021 - 12:22 PM

I am quite confused while determining CCPs in my process steps. There are some stages where hazardous chemicals are introduced in the process, also in the next stage, centrifugation can remove that chemical to an acceptable level (Though centrifugation is not intended for only to remove the chemical). While, there are several washing in the later stages certainly remove the chemical with keeping minimum residue, if the centrifugation can't remove it. But, I feel that we can validate the centrifugation stage that it can reasonably reduce the hazard to an acceptable level in spite of having washing steps later. Then, which point should I mention as CCP? Can centrifugation step be a CCP? Even, if the later stages by default can reduce the hazard? 

 

Another confusion is that, I see most of the people are talking that contamination by spoilage bacteria is not a food safety hazard. In case of meat, we must control spoilage bacteria to protect the meat from spoilage. Certainly, some pathogenic bacteria can also cause spoilage. But, my question is, people eat meat by cooking or frying (If not they are already cooked in the processing factory), so in addition to spoilage bacteria, pathogenic bacteria can will also be destroyed by cooking. So why we consider only Pathogenic bacteria to determine Biological Hazard and CCP?



adamperry2235

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Posted 02 November 2021 - 01:20 PM

I would identify your centrifuge as a CP and not a CCP. Consider your CCP as your last line of defense, in that if that goes awry then you need to shut down everything until its passing again. Your CCP would be your final check of the product to ensure the hazard is at a safe level or eliminated.



Scampi

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Posted 02 November 2021 - 01:28 PM

pathogenic bacteria have the ability to contaminate consumers entire kitchens prior to the cooking step

 

if you send out raw chicken with say, salmonella, and that person doesn't see that it dripped on the way to the pan, and then puts something like a fresh tomato in the same spot, the tomato is now contaminated with salmonella which in turn could lead to salmonella poisoning EVEN IF the chicken is cooked properly

 

The CHICKEN is still the source

 

that is why PATHOGENIC (a bacterium, virus, or other microorganism) causing disease.)  matters in the hazard analysis and control

 

Spoilage bacteria prevention is a good thing (obvs) but pales in comparison----no one is eating green chicken or stinky foods at all, they automatically get tossed 

 

It's important to fully understand YOUR BACTERIA in YOUR plant so you can fully understand the risks involved and why the mitigation strategies are so important


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


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MazidM

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Posted 02 November 2021 - 02:46 PM

Hi, thanks for the clarification.



Charles.C

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Posted 02 November 2021 - 03:21 PM

I am quite confused while determining CCPs in my process steps. There are some stages where hazardous chemicals are introduced in the process, also in the next stage, centrifugation can remove that chemical to an acceptable level (Though centrifugation is not intended for only to remove the chemical). While, there are several washing in the later stages certainly remove the chemical with keeping minimum residue, if the centrifugation can't remove it. But, I feel that we can validate the centrifugation stage that it can reasonably reduce the hazard to an acceptable level in spite of having washing steps later. Then, which point should I mention as CCP? Can centrifugation step be a CCP? Even, if the later stages by default can reduce the hazard? 

 

Another confusion is that, I see most of the people are talking that contamination by spoilage bacteria is not a food safety hazard. In case of meat, we must control spoilage bacteria to protect the meat from spoilage. Certainly, some pathogenic bacteria can also cause spoilage. But, my question is, people eat meat by cooking or frying (If not they are already cooked in the processing factory), so in addition to spoilage bacteria, pathogenic bacteria can will also be destroyed by cooking. So why we consider only Pathogenic bacteria to determine Biological Hazard and CCP?

In fact, if the pathogenic microbial species can be assumed to be satisfactorily eliminated by the consumer's cooking, it will not be associated with a process CCP from a haccp POV.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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