Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

9th Major Allergen FDA

FDA sesame allergens updated list

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

Scampi

    Fellow

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 4,331 posts
  • 1188 thanks
914
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 26 April 2022 - 04:10 PM

Hey hey peeps--have a read if you have not already   Sesame has been added to the FDA list of allergens 

 

https://www.fda.gov/.../food-allergies

 


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


Thanked by 1 Member:

Brothbro

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 48 posts
  • 11 thanks
9
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Aimlessly browsing wikipedia and the internet at large

Posted 26 April 2022 - 06:05 PM

Thanks for the heads up Scampi! Be ready ya'll, looks like labeling requirements are effective January 1st, 2023.


Edited by Brothbro, 26 April 2022 - 06:06 PM.


Mister Mark

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 2 posts
  • 0 thanks
1
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 27 April 2022 - 03:22 PM

I am curious on how everyone is going to handle labeling.  Our risk assessment indicates we are incapable of eliminating sesame seeds 100% - seeds are small and can get into slicers and conveyor belts and could shake loose and one or two end up on a "non-sesame seed product".  In our case, sesame seeds will be our only allergen (except wheat which is in everything we produce) and its one of many baked goods we produce so we might consider putting sesame seeds into our ingredient deck and our "may contain" statement like some of the very large bakeries are doing.  What do you all think?



Scampi

    Fellow

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 4,331 posts
  • 1188 thanks
914
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 27 April 2022 - 03:26 PM

I would change your labelling absolutely. 

Following one of the allowed labelling formats

 

The name of the food source of a major food allergen must appear:

In parentheses following the name of the ingredient.
Examples: “lecithin (soy),” “flour (wheat),” and “whey (milk)”

— OR —

Immediately after or next to the list of ingredients in a “contains” statement.
Example: “Contains wheat, milk, and soy.”

 

FDA guidance for the food industry states that advisory statements should not be used as a substitute for adhering to current good manufacturing practices and must be truthful and not misleading.


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


MDaleDDF

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 228 posts
  • 79 thanks
172
Excellent

  • United States
    United States

Posted 27 April 2022 - 04:30 PM

They've been on the horizon, and have been banned from my building for years now.   I actually got rid of them just because they were such a pita, like Mister Mike says.  They would lodge themselves in every part of our mixing and packing machines and we ditched them due to that, but they'd be gone anyways now! 

 

I personally don't put much faith in may contain statements of any kind.   Are they not legally dubious if something actually occurs?   Maybe buy some sesame powder and put .01% into everything you make?   I don't even know if there is such a thing, but as I've stated before, that's how I handle allergens here.   We have 4, and they all 4 go into every product we make.



Thanked by 2 Members:

olenazh

    Grade - PIFSQN

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 982 posts
  • 296 thanks
294
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Toronto
  • Interests:My job, church, reading, gym, horror movies

Posted 27 April 2022 - 06:33 PM

They've been on the horizon, and have been banned from my building for years now.   I actually got rid of them just because they were such a pita, like Mister Mike says.  They would lodge themselves in every part of our mixing and packing machines and we ditched them due to that, but they'd be gone anyways now! 

 

I personally don't put much faith in may contain statements of any kind.   Are they not legally dubious if something actually occurs?   Maybe buy some sesame powder and put .01% into everything you make?   I don't even know if there is such a thing, but as I've stated before, that's how I handle allergens here.   We have 4, and they all 4 go into every product we make.

I wish it could work for any situation, but unfortunately it doesn't: say, in ice cream manufacturing it's impossible to put "a little bit of every allergen" in all ice creams, the ingredient list wouldn't look good (Mint Chocolate ice cream cannot contain sesame or peanut). Though, the idea is great!



MDaleDDF

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 228 posts
  • 79 thanks
172
Excellent

  • United States
    United States

Posted 28 April 2022 - 02:22 PM

I wish it could work for any situation, but unfortunately it doesn't: say, in ice cream manufacturing it's impossible to put "a little bit of every allergen" in all ice creams, the ingredient list wouldn't look good (Mint Chocolate ice cream cannot contain sesame or peanut). Though, the idea is great!

Yeahhhhhh, that's why I don't have celery in my building any longer.   It wouldn't look real good on a waffle cone ingredient statement, lol.....



Thanked by 1 Member:




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users