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Theme Park Food Kiosk : Pest Control


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#1 bro32march

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Posted 26 August 2004 - 03:06 PM

Hi there....

How could pest control be effectively maintained in a theme park where walking and flying insects, lizards, even rats could be found, anytime, anywhere?

There are all sorts of food kiosks in a theme park:

1/ those with open kitchens; where 3 sides of the premises opened for business

2/ those without kitchens, with equipments such as sausage (hotdog) rollers on front counters; where 3 sides of the premises opened for business

3/ those with wheels, selling snow cones topped with fruit syrups which attract gangs of bees during operation

Comments? :yeahrite:


Paul.......



#2 Simon

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Posted 26 August 2004 - 09:37 PM

Hello Bro, welcome to the forums. :thumbup:

What an interesting and extremely difficult question you ask - for me anyhow. :ejut:

I'm not an expert on pest control and especially pest control for theme parks. I presume its outdoors so straight away you are into difficulties with nature being what it is. The only things I can think of is ensure that everything is meticulously clean and rubbish, waste food etc. is removed quickly to minimise the attraction of pests. Also if possible keep plant undergrowth trimmed back to reduce hiding / living places for potential pests. Maybe you could try and locate the food kiosks in clear, concreted, or paved areas. Fly screens / nets may also be an option on the open sides of kiosks that are not used for serving customers.

I don't think you will ever stop the pests completely but taking some of the actions above might help to minimise them.

I hope others with a little more pest control knowledge will be able to offer you some more advice. :helpplease:

Regards,
Simon


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#3 Puzzle

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 07:47 AM

Interesting question.

How about encompassing all of the mobile facilities??

ie the 'burger bars' that we all see at markets etc.

These things always worry me...............



#4 johnwhittaker

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 11:07 AM

Now theres food for thought (pardon the pun)!
Obviously you would have to have a very good working relationship with the pest control contractor, or maybe even have someone on site who is employed to control pests on a day to day basis.



#5 Charles Chew

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 02:51 PM

Hi Bro,

Yes, it is a refreshing subject. It is basically "food service industry" type of pest control with a major twist.

The main problems are with issues concerning items (1) and (3). Item (2) can be controlled and there are barriers to protect the foods which are ready-to-eat type.

Your pests are divided into two types:
1. Those that are attracted to your premise due to available foods and lights at night only.
2. Those that are attracted to your premise due to food at night and excellent harbourage in the day time.

Pests under (1) are difficult to control due to your open area domain. However, there are certain "long wave lights" that were detract insects with irritant effects on their compound eyes....pest contractors do not tell you these tricks

Where possible, place lights at a safe distance away from foods and cooking areas. Separate cooking and cooked food retension areas. Pests do not normally go near cooking areas where it is hot but are attracted to areas / stores where ingredients and other raw material are kept. So these are your critical areas. Main pests are rats (Item 2)

Finished products is always attracted to pests but concern is about pests attracted by lights and smells of foods and they come and go.

On pests where harbourage is the main culprit, please refer to Simon's comments.

Bro, it is a big subject and I am sure others will shade further lights on this situation that you have raised.

Regards
CharleChew


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#6 bro32march

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Posted 27 August 2004 - 06:27 PM

Gentlemen....

Thanks for the comments.

Actually I was a caterer at a theme park a year ago. Being a member of the HACCP team, I was responsible for pest control of all food kiosks, the central production unit, the warehouse, etc..

Honestly, I did not really know much about pest control. But I knew what to do to get those HACCP certificates/licences.

Fact is, no one can guarantee a 100% efficient pest-terminate scheme in any open area.... 'cos accidents do happen!

On an April evening, a busy kiosk where "long wave lights" had been installed was 'attacked' by a huge flock of flying ants. Few minutes after I got the May-Day message on the walkie talkie, I arrived at the scene and saw dead and alive insects everywhere... the floor, which was used to be silver in color, had been 're-furnished' dark-brown!

On any hot and sunny summer day, gangs of customers PLUS bees could be seen lining up for snowcone (mobiles) everywhere in the park.

What's good is --- HACCP auditors never work till evenings, and they would never see any mobile facilities opened for business on their inspection day.

So, if and only if the above examples were seen by the auditors, would I get certified??


Regards,
Paul........



#7 Charles Chew

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Posted 28 August 2004 - 09:46 AM

o, if and only if the above examples were seen by the auditors, would I get certified??


Excellent question!

My answer to you is I do not know because it is up to the specific auditor to evaluate whether the bees or flying ants etc are a threat to your food safety program and would indeed be a food safety issue that could lead to a threat to public health.

:uhm: If I am the auditor, yes you would be certified. My reason is simply base on the fact that you have taken all that is possible to protect your premise away from pest like ....."those long wave lights" that did not work because flying ants do not have compound eyes.

However, having said that, I would have mentioned in my report that there is room for improvements in Pest Control or the worse it can be would be a minor where changes to the way foods are prepared be conducted be reviewed and similar incidents if reoccurred could NOT be prevented (natural events) BUT could be protected.

Just my comments........because of the difficult situation, I am sure others have different views!

Question - Could the auditor prevent these flying insects / ants from entering his own domain if he had been similarly attacked at his home?

Regards
Charles Chew
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#8 Simon

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Posted 01 September 2004 - 02:41 PM

What's good is --- HACCP auditors never work till evenings, and they would never see any mobile facilities opened for business on their inspection day.

If none of the above work consider rolling your HACCP certificate into a tight tube and use it to swat the flying ants. Make sure you roll the certificate with the lettering on the inside as it makes a real mess and looks terrible when its back in the frame.

The true value of a HACCP Cert! :lol2:

Hope this helps.

Regards,
Simon

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