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ratman

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Posted 11 June 2003 - 08:30 PM

:blink: hi guys and gals,
I have been checking the internet for some difinitive information and facts on the exact colur spectrum that a wasp can see in and for some info on what they can + can't see, navigational systems etc, and can't find anything!

Can someone please help?

I would really appreciate an e-mail.

Thank you.

Adam


Simon

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Posted 11 June 2003 - 08:36 PM

Hi Ratman and welcome.

Whoosh!

That was the sound of your query passing right over my head. That said I'm sure somebody who looks in will be able to help you. I'm curious why do you want to know?

:unsure:
Regards,
Simon


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Simon

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Posted 12 June 2003 - 06:21 AM

Hi Ratman

After staying up all night reading through entimology books I have some information for you. ;) I actually posted your query on PCT Online a US pest control portal, I have extracted the discussion from the PCT forum 'as-is'.

A favour please Guys & Gals?

Posted By simon on 6/11/2003 at 4:51 PM
I run a website based in the UK for food packaging industry quality professionals. Plant Hygiene is important to us guys and pest control is one part of this. OK the site has a discussion forum and one of the many topics is pest control, a guy has just asked an amazingly difficult question about 'wasps eye's' that has whooshed over my head, I like to be helpful so I wondered if any of you PCT experts could do us a mighty favour and answer the question. I'd be grateful, I'm not looking for traffic I just want to help the guy get the info he's looking for.

Thanks,
Simon
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Re: A favour please Guys & Gals?
Posted By Mike Powers on 6/11/2003 at 10:59 PM

You can pass this along if it seems like something he'd be interested in. As a guest, I couldn't post it on your board.
Displays of bright red flowers catch our eye. And while most people also enjoy looking at white flowers, these are often not as easily noticed by humans. Animals vary in their ability to see and discriminate among colors. For example, humans see colors between the wavelengths of about 380 nm (violet) and 780 nm (deep red), and our eyes are most sensitive to blue (436 nm), green (546 nm), and red (700 nm). Insects, on the other hand, can usually see colors at shorter wavelengths than humans. For example, bees see mainly from 300 nm to 700 nm. Thus, bees are much less sensitive than we are to long-wave light, and have difficulty discriminating among shades that we perceive as red. And there are colors that they can see - those between 300 and 380 nm -that are invisible to us! So flowers that are visually attractive to bees may not be as noticeable, attractive, or easily distinguishable to birds, and vice versa. Many bee-pollinated flowers are yellowish and bird-pollinated flowers are often red or orange. Flowers pollinated by moths are usually white to pale yellow, while bat-pollinated flowers are usually white to brown. Butterflies are often attracted to yellow or blue flowers. A note of caution is in order here: many flowers reflect light in several different wavelengths, and flowers that we perceive as, say, red, may be easily distinguished by bees because they also reflect in the blue wavelengths. Flower color plays a more complicated role than this might suggest.

Ref: Gordon A Fox
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Re: A favour please Guys & Gals?
Posted By Steve Tatro on 6/11/2003 at 11:17 PM
WOW Mike, Your makeing us all look good!
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Re: A favour please Guys & Gals?
Posted By justin ramsey on 6/12/2003 at 1:02 AM
Here is a website they might want to look at:

http://www.biol.lu.se/funkmorf/vision/eric.../opticsnoc.html
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Re: A favour please Guys & Gals?
Posted By simon on 6/12/2003 at 1:46 AM
Mike, Steve Justin...thanks a lot, I knew I'd come to the right place and I may well be back again sometime in the future.

You truly are the kings of pests and all things very ugly and annoying.

Regards,
Simon

Re: A favour please Guys & Gals?
Posted By Mike Powers on 6/12/2003 at 9:21 PM
I don't know what an "nm" is, but it's intresting there are colors we can't even see.
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Re: A favour please Guys & Gals?
Posted By Patrick Perry on 6/12/2003 at 10:46 PM
"nm" is an abbreviation for "nanometer".

1 nm = 0.000000001 meter.

That's one billionth of a meter.

Modified By Patrick Perry on 6/12/2003 at 10:56 PM
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Well I hope that helps with your research Ratman. Anyone have anything further to add?


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