Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Pest Management For The 21st Century


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

Poll: Who manages your pest control system? (14 member(s) have cast votes)

Vote Guests cannot vote

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,554 posts
  • 1323 thanks
744
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 18 January 2005 - 09:36 PM

Around five years ago commercial pest control services moved on somewhat when companies started providing reports at the end of each inspection (instead of days or weeks later). Laptop generated inspection reports containing digital photographs on proofing issues, stacking etc. (a picture paints a thousand words) was a great improvement, other things like online reports soon followed. At the time I moved a contract from Rentokil to benefit from the innovation (anything to make life easier), its true at the time Rentokil were pretty outdated and expensive. Not any more…

I was talking with a representative of Rentokil today and I was surprised to see how much they have moved on both technologically and environmentally in the last five years. It seems they've ‘listened to the customer'.

Here's a few of their developments:

1. They developed a ‘smart' insecticide that breaks down in a controlled manner, depending on its exposure to light. In dark areas where insects tend to congregate, it remains highly effective. In lighter areas, such as open spaces, it disappears relatively quickly - minimising any potential contact with non-target species, such as humans and pets.

2. They don't use fly zappers anymore, instead they now use flying insect encapsulation units (sounds impressive). The units use a powerful A-band ultra-violet light and pheromone lures with a slow winding adhesive film. This means no escape and no fragmentation, no ‘blow-out' of dead flying insects, no dissemination of airborne contaminated spores and no high voltage ‘arc' (a feature of ‘zappers').

3. Cool mouse traps called RADAR. A mouse entering the RADAR unit is immediately detected by a pressure pad, which causes the doors at either end to be dropped, sealing off the unit. CO2 is then released into the unit, killing the mouse without introducing any form of environmental risk. An LED flashes on the top of the unit to indicate there's a mouse in the house.

4. Baitless electronic mouse detection. Using the same pressure pad as RADAR the presence of mice is detected by the unit, which, in turn, activates an external LED signal to alert that immediate attention is necessary. Once activated, the LED flashes until checked.

5. Online pest management. Baits are barcoded and technicians use handheld scanners, data is captured and uploaded to the web. Amongst other things this allows the access of real-time data from remote locations, interrogation of all past records and data and the ability to track actions against recommendations made. If I heard right bait activity can be linked into the system, notifying the customer by email and the technician by text message if there's a mouse in the house.

Maybe I'm a bit behind the times, is this sort of stuff state of the art or par for the course nowadays? I was impressed anyway. :clap:

Regards,
Simon


Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 180 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html


Charles Chew

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,178 posts
  • 52 thanks
8
Neutral

  • Malaysia
    Malaysia
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malaysia
  • Interests:Food, food and food!

Posted 20 January 2005 - 06:41 AM

All sounds pretty good but I have a couple of issues here.

a. Using pheromone would tend to serve a different purpose. Rather than eradicating flies that "normally" are attracted to a facility because of availability of food - they are now attracted to the facility for a different reason. And, worse of all, only the "male flies" are drawn in.

b. Baitless Rat E-Trap using pressure pad sounds good but must be extremely expensive.

c. Scanner and Bar-Coded Traps and Stations will certainly comply with ISO 22519 for "traceability" but this system tend to be very expensive and facility owner will now have to invest in a high-tech scannner. But I must admit it is a good pest data logger.

Not surprised to find RFID technology being used in baits for tracking down pests when they return to their "home base" after consumption.

Is the current IPM System not sufficiently effective that we need to consider these high tech combative methods or are we simply not doing a good enough job?

Charles CHew


Cheers,
Charles Chew
www.naturalmajor.com

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,554 posts
  • 1323 thanks
744
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 20 January 2005 - 09:18 AM

Hello Charles,

b. Baitless Rat E-Trap using pressure pad sounds good but must be extremely expensive.

I didn't ask for prices but yes hi-tech, new or unique products usually command a higher price - that is until the competition copies it. I'll try and find out how much they are for interest.

c. Scanner and Bar-Coded Traps and Stations will certainly comply with ISO 22519 for "traceability" but this system tend to be very expensive and facility owner will now have to invest in a high-tech scanner. But I must admit it is a good pest data logger.

I mentioned previously the vast majority of companies in the UK outsource their pest control to a third party. It's the pest Control Company rather than the facility owner who provides and pays for the technology, barcode reader etc. That said the facility owner would obviously contribute through the cost of the pest control contract.

Is the current IPM System not sufficiently effective that we need to consider these high tech combative methods or are we simply not doing a good enough job?

You could argue that Charles but come on don't be a Luddite. The idea of these technological advances is to make the pest management system more effective and easier to manage. Wouldn't you love to be notified by email when a mouse takes a bait? :thumbup:

Regards,
Simon

Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 180 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html


Charles Chew

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,178 posts
  • 52 thanks
8
Neutral

  • Malaysia
    Malaysia
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Malaysia
  • Interests:Food, food and food!

Posted 21 January 2005 - 09:25 AM

Hi Simon,

General Ludd had no hands in this for sure!

Well, I must admit

Wouldn’t you love to be notified by email when a mouse takes a bait?

sounds pretty good.

CHarles Chew

Cheers,
Charles Chew
www.naturalmajor.com

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,554 posts
  • 1323 thanks
744
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 21 January 2005 - 11:24 AM

I've added a poll to this thread to see if the majority outsource pest control or manage it in-house. Please vote and let us know exactly which elements of the system you do or don't outsource. Also if you do use a pest control company tell us what innovative products and services they offer.

:off_topic:

Sorry Charles I have an uncanny knack of throwing things off topic.

The Achievements of `General Ludd'

Regards,
Simon


Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 180 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html


yorkshire

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 380 posts
  • 6 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yorkshire
  • Interests:Antiques<br />Buying Georgian houses<br />Fine Food &amp; Wine<br />Luxury Cars<br />(Mostly dreams)

Posted 24 January 2005 - 09:06 AM

Dear Simon,

I keep trying to post here but for some reason every time I loose all my typing.

I will keep typing in and editing my post.

My first point is should we be mentioning pest control companies by name..... I have had problems with a certain company but I do not wish to liable them.

My comments on the points raised are:

1. When treating areas with insecticide our problem would be it getting cleaned away before it has time to work. For example if we have ants in the canteen we have to ask the cleaners to miss around the edges for a couple of days. Our pest control contractor tends not to use alot of insecticide and emphasises more on cleaning and proofing issues.

2. We were sold these sticky roll units on the same basis. Unfortunately some of our areas our "dusty", the "dust" stick to the rolls and the flies fly in and out as they please. It is also worth noting that these units are not intrinsically safe as the UV bulbs still need a sparker.

3/4/5 When a rep tried to sell me these units they just had an LED on, great news if they now email the technician :uhm: . My problem with just the LED is who checks them? Do you have someone going round each day checking the baits (especially ones behind racking, etc. )?

The best advise is keep your factory clean and proof as best you can.


Edited by yorkshire, 24 January 2005 - 09:25 AM.

"Have the courage to be ignorant of a great number of things, in order to avoid the calamity of being ignorant of everything." Sydney Smith 1771 - 1845 www.newsinfoplus.co.uk

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,554 posts
  • 1323 thanks
744
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 24 January 2005 - 10:31 AM

I keep trying to post here but for some reason every time I loose all my typing.

I'm sorry about that Yorky. Is it just this one thread or have you been having problems in general?

My first point is should we be mentioning pest control companies by name..... I have had problems with a certain company but I do not wish to liable them.

If it's true and the critism is constructive I have no problem - anybody is free to post here and answer any critisism levelled.

The best advice is keep your factory clean and proof as best you can.

Thanks for your comments Yorky, and you're right cleaning and proofing (prevention) is always better than traps and insecticides (cure). Email alerts are top though. :thumbup:

Regards,
Simon

Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 180 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html


yorkshire

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 380 posts
  • 6 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Yorkshire
  • Interests:Antiques<br />Buying Georgian houses<br />Fine Food &amp; Wine<br />Luxury Cars<br />(Mostly dreams)

Posted 24 January 2005 - 11:06 AM

Simon,

No other problems with posting. I think it was just a blip with my PC :notworking:


"Have the courage to be ignorant of a great number of things, in order to avoid the calamity of being ignorant of everything." Sydney Smith 1771 - 1845 www.newsinfoplus.co.uk

SAM

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 146 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral
  • Location:Staffordshire, UK
  • Interests:Snowboarding, bruises (due to the snowboarding), reading, films, dancing, music

Posted 13 April 2005 - 02:35 PM

We had a problem with fruit flies and wasps last year, we found this company on the internet and the pots worked really well, Auditors liked them as well as there is very little risk to any product that may be around

Trap a Wasp

Nadine


Dance like no one is watching. Sing like no one is listening. Love like you've never been hurt and live like it's heaven on Earth.
--Mark Twain

Simon

    IFSQN...it's My Life

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 12,554 posts
  • 1323 thanks
744
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Married to Michelle, Father of three boys (Oliver, Jacob and Louis). I enjoy cycling, walking and travelling, watching sport, especially football and Manchester United. Oh and I love food and beer and wine.

Posted 14 April 2005 - 07:41 AM

Thanks for the link Nadine, I think I'll get some of those for the garden.

Regards,
Simon


Get FREE bitesize education with IFSQN webinar recordings.
 
Download this handy excel for desktop access to over 180 Food Safety Friday's webinar recordings.
https://www.ifsqn.com/fsf/Free%20Food%20Safety%20Videos.xlsx

 
Check out IFSQN’s extensive library of FREE food safety videos
https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html


Ptinid

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 40 posts
  • 10 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland
  • Interests:Pest Management, Angling, Blues. Not necessarily in that order!

Posted 03 February 2012 - 09:50 AM

Hi Simon

Rentokil's system using technology is certainly 'state of the art' as far as it goes. Now I am a pest control professional, and not Rentokil, so I am likely to be biased (just to make it clear). I do have a few issues with some of the systems they and other companies use.

1. Total encapsulation EFKs. Great for catching flies. Not so good for getting an accurate count. The rolls can be unrolled, but my experience is that many insects are damaged beyond recognition when doing so. Further, I have seen techs count simply what is on the visible panel and not bother unrolling - which means that the count could be from half an hour's worth of flies or a few days worth, but certainly not a full period.

2. Bar-coding and hand-held scanners make the techs job easier. It also makes it easier to remain a 'box-checker'. I have seen some dreadful service on sites using these scanners (from multiple companies) because the tech walks up to the wall/box, scans it and walks on to the next one. The prospect of checking what is going on between the boxes is foreign to some (not singling anybody out - it happens in almost all companies at times)

3. How the data is presented to the client is critical. Most web-based systems I have seen have navigation difficulties and getting the data presented in the way the clients want is a pain if even possible. When buying these, you MUST check that it will do what you want before you make the change.

At the end of the day, the technology, whether electronic of the pesticides) is there to help. Old fashioned pesticides will still kill pests if applied properly. Much of this is akin to the angling shop. Anglers catch fish - angling shops catch anglers! What really matters is well-trained, competent, professional and thorough pest controllers on site doing the job. That is what you should be buying. How the technology works or helps should be an add-on to that.



Thanked by 1 Member:

Bunny

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 32 posts
  • 13 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Guildford, Surrey
  • Interests:Good Food, Wine, Beer and other Spirits and of course Pest Control in the food industry.

Posted 03 February 2012 - 05:59 PM

Blimey this is an old thread,

I concur with Ptinid entirely, what you should be asking is "is the technician on my site trained, qualified, competent?"

The rest is just icing, you may be surprised to learn even now that may not be the case. Only now are the trade associations accepting minimum standard of qualification for technicians is the way forward.

From the end of 2012 all technicians of BPCA member companies will be required to be qualified to minimum level 2 in pest management and be on a recognised CPD scheme. The NPTA unfortunately have missed the boat on this one and do not consider that continual professional development is appropriate as a membership criteria.

You can make up your own headlines for that one then!!!!!!!!!!!!Posted Image

So the moral of the story is: You pays your money you take your choice

BunnyPosted Image


"If you think it is expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."
Red Adair, American Oil Well Firefighter.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users