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FSSC 22000 - What Compressed Air Controls are Required?

compressed air filter fssc 22000 air compressor oil food grade oil

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#1 farizah

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 12:53 PM

Hi everyone,
 

Need some advice here. next week my company will have an audit on FSSC 22000. I would like to ask regarding air compressor , is it consider  non conformance if we didn't install a filter at the point of use to control the compressed air quality. for your information we only use the air compressor for machine cleaning purpose and in the pneumatic machine. One more question, is it ok to have reading on oil contaminant in the compressed air since our air compressor oil is food grade?

 

 

Someone please help me :helpplease:


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#2 Tony-C

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Posted 28 November 2014 - 01:48 PM

Hi Farizah,

 

I think that you are saying there is possible incidental product contact, so yes there should be a filter, if you refer to TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ISO/TS 22002-1 Prerequisite programmes on food safety — Part 1: Food manufacturing you will see:

6.5 Compressed air and other gases
Compressed air, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and other gas systems used in manufacturing and/or filling shall be constructed and maintained so as to prevent contamination.
Gases intended for direct or incidental product contact (including those used for transporting, blowing or drying materials, products or equipment) shall be from a source approved for food contact use, filtered to remove dust, oil and water.
Where oil is used for compressors and there is potential for the air to come into contact with the product, the oil used shall be food grade.
Use of oil free compressors is recommended.
Requirements for filtration, humidity (RH%) and microbiology shall be specified.
Filtration of the air should be as close to the point of use as is practicable.

 

Regards,

 

Tony


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#3 farizah

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 01:20 AM

Hi Tony,

 

 

Thanks for your explaination. Appreciate it. What about if the oil is detected in the compressed air. Is it become a risk to our product because our compressor oil is food grade? My maintenance arguing this issue with me...


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#4 Tony-C

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 04:16 AM

Hi Tony,

 

 

Thanks for your explaination. Appreciate it. What about if the oil is detected in the compressed air. Is it become a risk to our product because our compressor oil is food grade? My maintenance arguing this issue with me...

 

Hi Farizah,

 

I would say that the risk from food grade oil is probably minimum and your maintenance people may be right but you don't want 'crap' from compressed air near your product and the standard quite clearly states that filtration is required, show it to them:

 

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATION ISO/TS 22002-1 Prerequisite programmes on food safety — Part 1: Food manufacturing you will see:

6.5 Compressed air and other gases
Gases intended for direct or incidental product contact (including those used for transporting, blowing or drying materials, products or equipment) shall be from a source approved for food contact use, filtered to remove dust, oil and water.

 

Regards,

 

Tony


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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 29 November 2014 - 07:35 PM

Dear farizah,

 

 "food grade" as applied to a compressor oil is of a somewhat different edibility as compared to, say. food grade salt.

 

Additionally to Tony's reference, and depending on the specific application, some recommended limits for "oil" content in delivered compressed air do exist, eg as in the BCAS COP for Food Grade Compressed Air.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#6 farizah

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Posted 01 December 2014 - 12:07 AM

Hi Tony and Charles,

 

Noted on that. Thanks for the exlplanation :spoton:


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#7 Trace Analytics

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 02:00 PM

Hello Farizah-

 

I would like to point out something that is often misunderstood when discussing food grade oil and oil that can be found in your compressed air. The "intake" of your compressor will pull in oil from the ambient air. So simply using food grade oil does not by any stretch mean that you will not have an oil problem. The oil that is pulled in by the compressor is not always going to be food grade. That oil is more likely coming from vehicles and other pollution found in typical ambient air. Many folks think they don't need to test for oil because they are using food grade oil in their system. This thought process is false. Not testing oil levels because of this belief can lead to oil contamination of the final product. It is also important to use a lab that has the ability to measure oil as low as 0.01mg/m3, otherwise again, you risk contamination of your final product because measurements were not low enough to detect problems.

 

Hope this helps! It is a GREAT question that many people are misinformed on.

 

If I can ever assist please feel free to contact me! Laura


Edited by Laura Gunn, 09 January 2015 - 05:05 PM.

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#8 Loren

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 04:37 PM

Hello,

 

Thank you for this discussion. I this requirement also strictly required on packaging company? Another thing is we are not pursuing ISO and I'm sure our management would argue that we are not going for ISO and BRC for packaging is not so specific as this line posted by Tony.

 

Thank you always!


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#9 freeromios

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 03:20 PM

Thanks very much Laura for the insight.


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#10 fgjuadi

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 05:01 PM


If I can ever assist please feel free to contact me! Laura

 

Ah!  Emails are a no-no on these forums, you'll get a ton of spam from bots crawling the web.  But it's great to have another resource to talk to, and we can always use the messaging system to send individuals contact info for outside the forums.


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#11 Trace Analytics

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 05:06 PM

magenta_majors Thank you for the reminder! I deleted the email. Have a wonderful weekend all!
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#12 virgo08

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 10:20 AM

I agree with Tony.  Once the filter is in place, maintenance should include that in the maintenance program.


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#13 SGen

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 07:15 AM

Requirements for filtration, humidity (RH%) and microbiology shall be specified.
Filtration of the air should be as close to the point of use as is practicable.

 

 

So there is no specified humidity lvl? Because I am trying to get a new compressed air system with a cold dryer -40°C to ensure a really low humidity (now we have -5°C).


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#14 dianasamson

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 07:29 AM

how do we verify the effectivity of filter used in compressed air


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#15 SGen

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 07:44 AM

microbiological -> test air samples from before filter and after filter on spores and any type of microorganismen that might be harmful to your customer

 

We are doing a weekly monitoring. After a while you can see a trending -> number of MO rises its time for a filter change -> maybe you can adjust monitoring frequence based on the results you have

 

 

Regarding physical contaminants.... maybe depending on the system you can measure pressure? So in case a filter is blocked usually the resistance rises...

 

 

 

How do you specify "Filtration of the air should be as close to the point of use as is practicable"?

As I know our filter is placed ~100m before point of use.... I guess thats too far away...


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#16 dianasamson

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 08:14 AM

thank you very much sir.. may I ask what frequency would you recoment for microbial verification?


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#17 SGen

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 08:28 AM

As I said we do weekly measurements, but I guess it depends on your target group and their sensitivity to microbes.

Our "consumers" are babies thats why our frequence is relatively high.

I assume for adults monthly monitoring would be enough. What do the others think? I guess it depends on the initial situation. So when you have no clue at all about the microbiological quality of your compressed air you should do more testing and after a while you can adapt the frequency depending on the results.


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#18 Charles.C

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 01:04 PM

In fact, as usual, a risk assessment is involved. The required microbiological "quality" of the delivered compressed air is a function of your process (and maybe yr FS standard / local regulatory requirements (if any)), eg see this post and the surrounding posts -

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ent/#entry81054

 

Rgds Charles.C


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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