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Leak testers

packaging leak testing

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#1 matthewcc

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:45 PM

Hi there, for container/closure systems, what sort of leak testing equipment do you use for bottles (e.g., with induction seal lids, dropper tops, etc.) that you are producing on your packaging line?  Is it of the vacuum or pressure design, and why?  I saw this topic for bag leak testing, but not for bottles.

 

Also, are you using test methods such as ASTM F2338 - 09(2013)?

 

We are manufacturing dietary supplements in the US under 21 CFR part 111.

 

Thank you in advance,

Matthew


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#2 GMO

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:17 AM

Are you gas flushing in any way?


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#3 matthewcc

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 02:56 PM

Before use, each bottle is turned upside down and flushed out with ionized air in order to remove any dust that might be present.  Is that what you meant?


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#4 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 03:48 PM

I think he meant purging the headspace with nitrogen or CO2.

 

If you're testing for air leaks (oxygen transfer, confirm hermetic seal) I would think they would typically rely on vacuum to determine if air transfer is possible or at what rate, while a non-airtight seal might be more prone to rely on a pressure system to check for potential of product leaks. That is, at least for flexible bottles like PET that can be squeezed. I'm not sure how glass is typically leak checked unless in vacuum.

 

Depending on your seal requirements, a leak check could be as simple as dunking a package in a water tank and hand squeezing while looking for bubbles. But I'm not familiar with the ASTM standards. I recently got cold-called by a company that does leak testing equipment for flexible packaging that might know more and/or sell you something cool (I am not affiliated).

 

http://taptone.com/


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#5 GMO

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 08:37 AM

Yes I did mean are you flushing with CO2 or similar.  If you are then you can get leak detectors to test for leaking of the gas which are far more effective at finding leaks IME than other types.

 

I have also used a water tank but one specifically designed for the purpose where the container is put under a known pressure in the water.  They aren't nearly as accurate as the leak detection looking for gas though and can often miss microleaks.  The other problem is you can't test every pack.

 

Depending on your packs and if the leaks are caused by a seal being crimped incorrectly depending on your bottle type, a vision system may be an option?


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