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Listeria monocytogenes - How Tough are You?


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Poll: Listeria monocytogenes - How Tough are You? (47 member(s) have cast votes)

Compared to all other bacteria, viruses and other vomit inducing bugs

  1. Tyson – pound for pound the scariest bacteria in town (13 votes [27.66%])

    Percentage of vote: 27.66%

  2. Heavy weight – I wouldn’t want to meet him on a dark night (23 votes [48.94%])

    Percentage of vote: 48.94%

  3. Middle weight – Hmmm…to fight or to flight (7 votes [14.89%])

    Percentage of vote: 14.89%

  4. Light weight – You talking to me? (4 votes [8.51%])

    Percentage of vote: 8.51%

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#26 Tony-C

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 05:05 AM

Dear Tony,

(only slightly OT) - This other link within yr excellent first one ( :thumbup: ) is also very interesting -

http://www.ap-foodte...ady-to-eat-food

It does rather look as the whole issue of the risk from L.mono is heating up again, ie official "backs" are being analysed for coverage again.

@ Simon - yes (99.9% anyway) but perhaps no eatable chicken left after the "decent" time. (This is the continuous problem of course)

Rgds / Charles.C


I am surprised that is only the UK Chilled foods assoc that has challenged this as from my experience if you wanted to buy some Listeria you went for some unpasteurised cheese which certainly isn't predominant in the UK. :rolleyes:

The question is if you are a manufacturer and you know you have L.mono in your food would you leave it on the shelf?

Regards,

Tony

#27 Snitzel

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 10:40 AM

The question is if you are a manufacturer and you know you have L.mono in your food would you leave it on the shelf?


I do not think that people that work in the quality sector -and respect the function of their role- would choose to leave the contaminated product on the selves. But at the end of the day the decission is made from the MD of the company.

#28 Tony-C

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Posted 04 September 2009 - 01:06 PM

I do not think that people that work in the quality sector -and respect the function of their role- would choose to leave the contaminated product on the selves. But at the end of the day the decission is made from the MD of the company.


All the MD's I have worked with would follow my advice to withdraw the product.

There may be some that would not but those people would be gambling the future of the company. :silly: Not sure it would be worth it. A quality defect yes a pathogen no.

Regards,

Tony

#29 Jean

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 05:52 AM

I have read some topics related to L. monocytogenes from the link below.

http://www.foodprodu...essure-cleaning


Best regards,

J

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#30 Tony-C

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 06:23 AM

I have read some topics related to L. monocytogenes from the link below.

http://www.foodprodu...essure-cleaning


This has come up before, anyone that uses high pressure washers to clean drains in manufacturing areas needs their head examined :wacko:

Regards,

Tony

#31 Jean

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 07:18 AM

This has come up before, anyone that uses high pressure washers to clean drains in manufacturing areas needs their head examined

Regards,

Tony



Hi Tony,



I do agree this is a known fact, but the link had few more topics referencing to L.monocytogenes. The link which I had pasted was the last one which I had read. Anyway, reading again and again oldies do help…. :rolleyes:



http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Codex-confirms-alternative-approach-for-listeria-monocytogenes-in-ready-to-eat-food

http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Longer-shelf-life-for-some-RTE-foods-contributes-to-Listeria-rise-expert

http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/On-your-radar/Contamination/Listeria-biofilm-under-attack-from-new-disinfectant

http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Listeria-in-salmon-killed-by-smoke-treatment-Study

http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Risk-of-infant-foetal-mortality-from-Listeria-higher-than-believed

http://www.foodproductiondaily.com/Quality-Safety/Microwaving-frankfurters-cuts-Listeria-risk-Study
Best regards,

J

Only the curious will learn and only the resolute overcome the obstacles to learning. The quest quotient has always excited me more than the intelligence quotient. Eugene S Wilson

#32 Jean

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Posted 25 November 2009 - 07:22 AM

Has there been any change in ready-to-eat foods criteria for L.mono from 100cfu/g??


Best regards,

J

Only the curious will learn and only the resolute overcome the obstacles to learning. The quest quotient has always excited me more than the intelligence quotient. Eugene S Wilson

#33 Charles.C

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Posted 11 March 2010 - 12:19 AM

Dear Jean,

Actually, AFAIK, it is still zero tolerance in USA although I noticed was under review in 2009, eg see -

http://www.fda.gov/I...ual/default.htm
(note entry 02/06/2008 )

And also some other countries I believe like Australia for certain products.

Even the EC may have some members exercising their right to disagree ?

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#34 Helen47

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 09:22 AM

Hi there

Not sure if anyone else here has experience of the STS system. They have recently revised their framework and now treat Listeria as other pathogens, i.e. none found in ready to eat foods. This is much tougher than the legal requirement here in the UK.

This appears to be driven by new research showing that listeria causes more illness than previously thought, particularly in the over 60s and in those whose immune systems are compromised. STS covers the 'public sector' here in the UK, including the NHS.

Regards
Helen



#35 Charles.C

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 04:37 AM

Hi there

Not sure if anyone else here has experience of the STS system. They have recently revised their framework and now treat Listeria as other pathogens, i.e. none found in ready to eat foods. This is much tougher than the legal requirement here in the UK.

This appears to be driven by new research showing that listeria causes more illness than previously thought, particularly in the over 60s and in those whose immune systems are compromised. STS covers the 'public sector' here in the UK, including the NHS.

Regards
Helen


Dear Helen,

Thks for the input. Any link available ??

now treat Listeria as other pathogens, i.e. none found in ready to eat foods.


This would imply a zero tolerance for S.aureus. Seems unlikely.

Regarding "Listeria" I presume the interpretation is L.monocytogenes.

Are STS requiring zero tolerance for all RTE foods ?

I believe a zero tolerance for L.mono. has long been established for certain foods in UK particularly as this is required by EC regulations. But not all. The HPA (formerly PHLS) seem to issue the most (UK) used Public Health Guidelines, food-wise. Latest issue 2010 AFAIK.

Attached File  HPA, 2010 rte micro.guidelines.pdf   998.98KB   6 downloads

I noticed this (perhaps related) document by FSA who control food Safety in UK, AFAIK -

Attached File  FSA Listeria Management Program 2010-2015.pdf   308.71KB   8 downloads

Looks like a work in progress. There certainly seems to be a case for some investigation.

Another related but older document (2006)-

Attached File  LACORS micro.examination sandwiches in hospitals, resid. care homes, focus L.monocytogenes.pdf   548.21KB   3 downloads

Rgds / Charles.C

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#36 cazyncymru

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Posted 24 December 2011 - 09:17 AM

Hi there

Not sure if anyone else here has experience of the STS system. They have recently revised their framework and now treat Listeria as other pathogens, i.e. none found in ready to eat foods. This is much tougher than the legal requirement here in the UK.

This appears to be driven by new research showing that listeria causes more illness than previously thought, particularly in the over 60s and in those whose immune systems are compromised. STS covers the 'public sector' here in the UK, including the NHS.

Regards
Helen



In Fairness, The STS Standard is used by the NHS, where you would assume that the majority of people are immuno suppressed, so i can understand why they would adopt a zero tolerance.

I've added the link, it's 2007. I'm not sure if it has been updated in recent years

Caz x

Attached File  Code%20of%20Practice%20Food%20Safety.pdf   179.65KB   10 downloads

#37 Charles.C

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 06:46 AM

Dear helen,

Would be interesting to know what was the actual change involved, eg what foods / original limits involved.

I hv no idea if NHS make their own food standards independently of FSA ?

AFAIK, FSA are obliged to follow the EC regulations (as against directives) where they exist unless a derogation is in place, but I'm no legal expert. :smile:

EC, L.mono. reqs since 2005 are AFAIK as per this attachment -

Attached File  L.mono. - EC 2073-2005.png   161.24KB   11 downloads

Maybe they have expanded the interpretation of "medical purposes".

@Caz, thks for 2007 COP, unluckily cannot see any specific mention re- micro.specs except for this -

4.16.6 The Company shall establish “physical” properties, microbiological and, where appropriate, chemical standards for the products and ingredients, having regard to any legislative requirements.


Hmmm.

Rgds / Charles.C

Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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