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What should be the frequency of migration testing?


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#1 Caddyshack

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Posted 08 September 2009 - 08:21 AM

Hi guys, On this topic

1) How often would a poly supplier test his their raw materials for migration as a minimum?
2) How is the test traceable to the finished product, if they only test for example once per year like my supplier?

Regards

Mike



#2 Simon

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 10:01 AM

Hi guys, On this topic

1) How often would a poly supplier test his their raw materials for migration as a minimum?
2) How is the test traceable to the finished product, if they only test for example once per year like my supplier?

Regards
Mike

Hi Mike,

Food contact materials must comply with the law and therefore initial migration testing before approving a material for food use is required. However, there are no rules or requirements in BRC Packaging Standard for subsequent migration testing, unless of course there was a change to the specification or a change to the legislation. This could be several years.
I have had the same question leveled at me by both BRC auditors and customer auditors in the past and it is a good discussion. Customers naturally say annually without being able to explain why if nothing has changed and we are buying to a fixed specification. Migration testing is a very expensive undertaking, especially if for example the supplier has a range of specifications. Maybe an annual review to check the law and the specification would be expected.

The traceability to the end product is not on a batch to batch basis but that the end product was produced with material of that approved specification.

It is an interesting debate and as such I’ve split from the original topic which was a bit ‘off topic’.

Regards,
Simon

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#3 Caddyshack

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Posted 11 September 2009 - 01:27 PM

Cheers Simon very helpful!!



#4 okido

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 05:58 AM

The scientific and industry standard is 3 years + 3 years for polymer based packaging materials.
This means that a test is done and a certificate for three years is given.
At the end of this first three years a theoretical evaluation is done and if there are no changes you get a certificate for an other 3 years.
Of course there should be no changes in processing, specifications and legislation.

Migration testing can be replaced by software modeling.
For the more common polymer packaging materials this technique is available and accepted.

Remember to share good fortune with your friends, Okido



#5 Simon

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Posted 14 September 2009 - 07:06 AM

The scientific and industry standard is 3 years + 3 years for polymer based packaging materials.
This means that a test is done and a certificate for three years is given.
At the end of this first three years a theoretical evaluation is done and if there are no changes you get a certificate for an other 3 years.
Of course there should be no changes in processing, specifications and legislation.

Migration testing can be replaced by software modeling.
For the more common polymer packaging materials this technique is available and accepted.

Remember to share good fortune with your friends, Okido

Okido, please can I ask a few questions for clarification:

1. Can you tell me the scientific and industry standard references that state 3 years?
2.What does a theoretical evaluation consist of?
3.How does software modeling work?

Thanks,
Simon

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#6 ubtoo

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 05:47 PM

That's all fine and dandy...but consider other factors.

Transport , Deliveries and Warehousing temperatures in the warmer months.

I've tested finished product in warehouses and trailers and found the temperatures to be as high as 140 degrees. For how long? And what migration is

Chemical Migration tesing after finished product has been intially introduced into a containers and held at high temperatures is what data my auditor is looking for.

My vendors write that they cannot be responsible the polymers or containers after we take possesion of them.

My company cannot afford this testing and rely on finished product testing of "product"...not for any migration substances.

Got an answer to that fellow ISQFN bretheren?

Be safe!



#7 ubtoo

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 06:25 PM

Corrections

1. And what migration is occurring?

2. Not polymers..... but Resin's



#8 Simon

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Posted 05 December 2010 - 02:31 PM

Can you provide more information on the products you are talking about Ubtoo, what they are how long they are stored, packaging type etc.


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