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Printing, Packaging, and Protecting Food

Live Webinar

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#1 Simon

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Posted 27 January 2015 - 10:00 PM

Printing, Packaging, and Protecting Food
Thomas J. Dunn, Managing Director, Flexpacknology llc

This Live Webinar is taking place: February 06, 2015 - 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM GMT

Reacting to the market recall of millions of Euros worth of packaged goods, governments and industry in Europe have established frameworks for good manufacturing practices and chemical limitations that apply to formulating and printing inks used for food contact materials. These proactive efforts have stopped what seemed to be an unmitigated risk to packaged foods. This webinar reviews expectations these frameworks have for food packaging manufacturers and the procedures manufacturers should follow to assure food safety. 

 


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#2 Simon

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 08:29 PM

Questions from the webinar:
 

  • What is the nature of reactions between active ingredients of food and inks used?
     
  • Are there limits for heavy metals for ink?
     
  • What recommended sources of information about the safety of food packaging inks can you suggested?
     
  • How to determine what compounds should be part of your migration testing? What should the tests be looking for? Any standards or lists of chemicals to look out for? We test for things like solvents, but the chemistry of inks is proprietary.
     
  • What is ink set off?
     
  • What is water based Ink for food packaging, is it a risk?
     
  • Monitoring the inks it can be the composition of the inks which you have from the supplier and the critical limits are according to the components of the ink.
     
  • What is the CCP in printing & manufacturing of metal crown corks for CSDs?
     
  • What for you is the best control for physical hazards after packaging?
     
  • Take your point on migration testing Simon but who pays for this? The packer filler? Prices are driven down constantly. Testing needs to be done by the food producer.
     
  • Are their companies that offer migration testing?
      
  • Is printing ink a CCP or OPRP?
      
  • Very concerned with no international std/ spec for safety limits for solvents..
     
  • What is the effect on wax paper used in wrapping of yeast?
      
  • Is compliance with ISO22002-4 best practice or a legal requirement?
      
  • How we assure that the food is safe in packaging material from Allergens as we use Lacquer during process; but no any Allergen Free Certificate or Food Grade Certificate has provided by any Supplier, however, the lacquer is an essential material in our process....what can we do in that case?
     
  • How can be a packaging material analyzed for microbiology. By swab or what else?
      
  • Is GMP mandatory for manufacturing ALL food packaging (secondary or tertiary) or specifically for FOOD-CONTACT packaging only?
      
  • What implies the relation of packaging surface to the packed weight for the migration?
      
  • Is there a " shelf life" for printed packaging?
      
  • Is there any "kit" to help us test the values on "free" solvents present on film?
      
  • Could you please give examples of FG fast dry solvents
      
  • Specifically how does one qualify an ink as "food grade "?
      
  • What is the risk of contamination for food packaged in a food-grade material bag, which is not printed itself, but rather has an external label placed on it?
     
  • Hello, are inks included in GRAS (Generally Recognised as Safe)?
     
  • Could someone please explain what is a "food grade ink"?
     
  • Glass bottles tend to be non porous. However, is there any chance of any ink penetrating this material to contaminate liquid contents?
     
  • Ink suppliers and packaging converters are more than willing to use 'food grade' products and GMP. It is convincing food producers to go that way that's difficult - cost!
     
  • is there limits for solvents residues?
     
  • Is it possible that a roll of film with not properly cured ink may cause rancidity to a high oil content product?
     
  • Are adhesives a risk too?

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https://www.ifsqn.com/food_safety_videos.html

 

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#3 Sharon (Dewsbury)

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 10:17 AM

Thanks for the Webinar. I found it very interesting and though provoking.

 

Am I correct in thinking that it is the responsibility of the food packer  to ensure safety and carry out migration of the whole pack? We manufacture printed cardboard sleeves/cartons as secondary packaging. The food packer places the food in a tray with a film seal and then our sleeve goes over this having no direct food contact. We use low migration inks and have good GMP to reduce the risk of migration and set off . We do not have an influence on the primary pack used with our product  and believe this is the responsibility of the next person in the supply chain but that we have done all that we can within our process to reduce the risk,

Are there any sleeve manufacturers like us out there  who do migration testing on printed cardboard???

 

I have worked in primary packaging (CPET, Poly prop, APET) and we did send our product for Migration testing on a regular basis. (PIRA & RAPRA in the UK but there may be others available)  We had a schedule to cover all the various plastics and all the colours in a 5 year rotation (Unless anything changed ) based on worst case scenario e.g. if we had several red CPET ones we would send the most heavily pigmented one only to represent the "family". Again we always got assurance from our raw material suppliers that they had complied with all the relevant legislation with regard to allowed & banned substances for food packaging. The migration testing was expensive and there are several mediums (Oil, Acetic Acid etc) so you need to chose the one which is best for the food it is going to hold. In some cases more than one test will be needed if the pack is to be used for several food products with differing constituents.

Regards

Sharon



#4 zac2944

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 10:04 PM

Thanks for the Webinar. I found it very interesting and though provoking.

 

Am I correct in thinking that it is the responsibility of the food packer  to ensure safety and carry out migration of the whole pack?

 

I think that to a degree all involved are responsible.  You as a supplier are obligated to obtain an understanding of end use.  Ultimate responsibility would fall on the food packer, but that doesn't absolve you of any responsibility.

 

My company makes flexible packaging, and although we don't always know the end use we assume that our material will touch food and treat it as such.  Ultimately, the customer (could be a food packer) must send a specification to us the supplier asking that we certify our material as meeting particular requirements. 



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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 12:16 AM

Dear Sharon,
 

 

Am I correct in thinking that it is the responsibility of the food packer  to ensure safety and carry out migration of the whole pack

 

As per their occasional website affirmations, this is one (legal) justification from the Manufacturer's (and Distributor's?) POV  for the BRC enterprise. Namely a nominal "proof" of Due Diligence. At least In the UK.

(Although, at least in the Food Sector, there are some well-publicized cases where FS lapses were proven to be simply undefendable. Case-by-case perhaps ?)

 

Rgds / Charles.C


Edited by Charles.C, 10 February 2015 - 01:56 AM.
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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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