Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

Allergens in staff lunches


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 PS1

PS1

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 21 posts
  • 10 thanks
5
Neutral

  • New Zealand
    New Zealand

Posted 05 July 2015 - 06:57 AM

Hi,

Just a few questions regarding staff lunches and the potential allergens they may have?

 

How many of you work for food (or packaging) manufacturers where peanuts, tree nuts etc are not allowed on site / part of staff lunches?

 

Would you say that peanuts are the most commonly excluded allergen from manufacturing sites (from staff lunch perspective)?

 

Would you say that it is becoming more common for manufacturers to ban peanuts etc?

 

Thanks in advance!!!



#2 Tony-C

Tony-C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,361 posts
  • 992 thanks
263
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Koh Samui
  • Interests:My main interests are sports particularly football, pool, scuba diving, skiing and ten pin bowling.

Posted 06 July 2015 - 03:01 AM

Hi PS1,

 

I would say the peanuts are definitely the most excluded allergen due to the serious nature of the allergic reaction in some people.

 

The most common approach is to do a risk assessment.

 

You will need to consider if you are making any 'allergy free' claims and the controls you have in place in preventing cross contamination from the lunch room to the production area such as hygiene barriers, hand wash, change of foot wear and the removal of protective clothing.

 

Regards,

 

Tony



Thanked by 1 Member:
PS1

#3 Ian R

Ian R

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 109 posts
  • 35 thanks
8
Neutral

Posted 08 July 2015 - 11:40 AM

Hi PS1

 

In the clients we work with all of then 'ban' peanuts and tree nuts from the site including staff lunches and vending machines.

 

When doing audits in the canteen I am always amused by the look of surprise on the face of the member of staff when you point out that the Peanut Lion bar contains peanuts.

They always seemed genuinely shocked!

 

rgds



#4 Mr. Incognito

Mr. Incognito

    "Mostly Harmless"

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,562 posts
  • 268 thanks
126
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 July 2015 - 11:50 AM

Where I work we do not allow "whole nut products" which basically spans the entire spectrum of nut and tree nut.

 

It took a bit of work to get full compliance because nobody was really aware of it until I started and saw it in the allergen policy.


____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mr. Incognito


:tardis:

Mr. Incognito is a cool frood who can travel the width and breadth of the galaxy and still know where his towel is.

#5 CMHeywood

CMHeywood

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 452 posts
  • 114 thanks
37
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Neenah, Wisconsin

Posted 08 July 2015 - 03:04 PM

I work for a company that makes packaging for food products.  We have nuts and other allergens in vending machines in lunch rooms.  Employees are also bringing in food that contain food allergens (egg, wheat = bread, etc.).  We require employees to wash their hands after eating food.  We emphasize and explain the reason in the food safety training we give to our employees.  We do not allow food on the production floor; only water in clear, colorless containers.



#6 Tony-C

Tony-C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,361 posts
  • 992 thanks
263
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Koh Samui
  • Interests:My main interests are sports particularly football, pool, scuba diving, skiing and ten pin bowling.

Posted 08 July 2015 - 04:43 PM

I work for a company that makes packaging for food products.  We have nuts and other allergens in vending machines in lunch rooms.  Employees are also bringing in food that contain food allergens (egg, wheat = bread, etc.).  We require employees to wash their hands after eating food.  We emphasize and explain the reason in the food safety training we give to our employees.  We do not allow food on the production floor; only water in clear, colorless containers.

 

I'm sure you audit compliance as well, I don't like clear containers particularly, what about protective clothing?

 

Regards,

 

Tony



#7 BrummyJim

BrummyJim

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 329 posts
  • 116 thanks
25
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South West
  • Interests:Motorbike gone now. Only the dog to walk!

Posted 10 July 2015 - 09:48 AM

All 3 companies I have worked for ban nuts from site including staff lunches/vending machines etc.



#8 classic

classic

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 67 posts
  • 10 thanks
1
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Female

Posted 10 July 2015 - 12:47 PM

The policy on our site is that nuts or nut containing products must not be brought in. That way we can maintain our 'nut' free status.

All staff are made aware of this on induction and in subsequent allergen awareness training. This needs to be policed as there is always someone who will 'forget' and bring in something 'illegal' as in a case of a buffet laid on for a staff members leaving do where pride of place on the table was a coffee cake which had on the top walnuts!!!! and the well meaning gift of cakes which contained almond slices. Obviously these 'illegal' items were immediately confiscated and taken off site for testing purposes.

Vending machines can also be a problem, especially where one of the items has previously been ok and is then found to contain almond paste!



#9 Mr. Incognito

Mr. Incognito

    "Mostly Harmless"

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,562 posts
  • 268 thanks
126
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male

Posted 10 July 2015 - 01:02 PM

Well people do make mistakes.  Someone brought in a dozen doughnuts for the operators and didn't notice they put in a peanut doughnut.  Of course the operators noticed right away and someone declared "Someone better eat that before (My name) sees it."  So one of the guys grabbed it and stuffed it in is face as quickly as possible.

 

So they know now and follow it but every once in a while someone makes a mistake.


____________________________________________________________________________________________________

Mr. Incognito


:tardis:

Mr. Incognito is a cool frood who can travel the width and breadth of the galaxy and still know where his towel is.

#10 qalearner

qalearner

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 93 posts
  • 17 thanks
7
Neutral

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 10 July 2015 - 04:17 PM

I too think that a risk assessment is the way to go. 

 

What type of product are you making? 

 

Who will be consuming the end product? 

 

What personal hygiene procedures do you have in place already?

 

I worked in one plant where there was a peanut free policy, but staff were allowed to where production smocks/uniforms in the cafeteria so cross contamination was a larger risk. In the plants where smocks were not allowed in the cafeteria it was peanut friendly.



#11 JThompson

JThompson

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 2 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 10 July 2015 - 05:05 PM

It was discussed at one point in my facility to be "allergen free" in the lunchroom, but maintaining 100% compliance would practically require a dedicated employee to check in the lunches brought in.  Our vending has reduced number of allergen-containing materials available in it.  We require employees to wash their hands after eating, no food or drink on the production floor, only water fountains available. 



#12 CMHeywood

CMHeywood

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 452 posts
  • 114 thanks
37
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Neenah, Wisconsin

Posted 10 July 2015 - 06:30 PM

Consider that the FDA lists eight major food allergens:

1.  Peanuts (the biggest problem)

2.  Milk, Cheese and other dairy products.

3.  Soybeans

4.  Gluten - wheat and other grains

5.  Egg

6.  Tree Nuts

7.  Fish

8.  Shellfish

 

If you're dealing with non-USA customers, you may also see sulfites, mustard, celery, etc.

 

This would eliminate almost all of the products in your vending machines and most of what your employees bring for meals.  You really should have a good hand washing policy in place.  Hand Sanitizers would not be allergen control; they kill the germs but not the allergens.



#13 Tony-C

Tony-C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,361 posts
  • 992 thanks
263
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Koh Samui
  • Interests:My main interests are sports particularly football, pool, scuba diving, skiing and ten pin bowling.

Posted 11 July 2015 - 03:59 PM

This would eliminate almost all of the products in your vending machines and most of what your employees bring for meals. 

 

:sorcerer: 

 

As well as hand washing a policy for removal of protective clothing but hence the need for a 'risk assessment' and the need to have policies based on that.

 

Regards,

 

Tony






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

EV SSL Certificate