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Yogurt production on micro scale


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#1 Dahmun

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 12:21 PM

Hi All,

I am interested in the development of small yogurt processing. What would entail in terms of machinery and processes to get this done?
Also since it is on a small scale, what form of packaging is recommended?



#2 garyandrews

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 03:04 PM

Dahmun

 

Happy to help if I can. When you say micro scale what size are you thinking?

 

Gary



#3 Dahmun

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Posted 02 June 2016 - 04:14 PM

About two or three persons working in a cottage industry type set up. Producing about 500L yogurt daily.

Also can same be done for ice cream?



#4 Dahmun

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 01:58 PM

Anything Gary?



#5 Charles.C

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 02:03 PM

Anything Gary?

 

Hi Dahmun,

 

I seem to recall seeing an actual, do-it-yourself, (UK) website relating to yr specific request. Unfortunately i don't offhand remember the link.

 

have you done much searching yet ?

 

It might also relate to the type of yoghurt envisaged ?

 

Tony may also be able to assist if he sees yr post.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#6 Dahmun

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 02:23 PM

Thanks for that Charles, much appreciated. I have done some searching but was looking for someone specifically who has done it before or has some sort of experience in yogurt and yogurt drink production.
I will look for the UK website.



#7 Charles.C

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 02:59 PM

Hi dahmun,

 

I only remember it because i came across it when researching the model iso-haccp plan for yoghurt on this forum. Was a 1-3 page item. From memory it was one of a series.

 

there was another one available from the Australian dairy organisation (i used their haccp plan) but the full details were accessible to members only.

 

i will check my archives for the UK one but it's 5 years back so a bit of a long shot. :smile:


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 Tony-C

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 05:07 AM

Hi Dahmun,

 

To make yogurt on this scale I would use the following:

 

A 500L tank with a strong agitator for heating, cooling and mixing the yogurt base

 

A filter (specification dependent on whether you are filling set or stirred yogurt)

 

A  basic filling line

 

A calibrated thermometer

 

I would pack into hot rinsed glass jars

 

The flow would be along the following lines:

 

Sterilize the tank/line with hot water and fill this water into the jars (put the lids on) to rinse/disinfect them then remove the lids and invert the jars in preparation for filling (alternatively you could buy a small rinser but this seems like a very hands on start up operation).

 

Heat the liquid elements of the yogurt base then when warm add dried ingredients slowly whilst agitating, when dissolved continue to heat the yogurt base to a (minimum of 63 °C and hold at this temperature for a minimum of 30 minutes). It may be that you can produce a better yogurt by heating to 95 ° C then cooling. It would also be better if you can recirculate from the tank whilst mixing.

 

Cool to 40 ° C (incubation temperature) then add the yogurt culture and mix thoroughly for 15 minutes.

 

For set yogurt fill straight away and then incubate the filled jars at 40 ° C until the pH reaches 4.5 then cool the jars and refrigerate.

 

For stirred yogurt ****ensure the agitator is switched off after 15 minutes**** hold at 40 ° C in the tank until the pH reaches 4.5 then cool (5 ° C - 25 °C depending on the texture required) and agitate but do not mix too much or you will completely destroy the texture of the yogurt. Fill into jars and then refrigerate.

 

Ideally for stirred yogurt I would want a second tank and pump through a filter into that tank where I could then also add fruit before filling if I wanted to make a fruited yogurt.

 

For tamper evidence I would use a sticky label over the lid that ripped when you opened the jar.

 

Note that the optimum incubation temperature will vary depending on the yogurt culture used.

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony



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#9 Charles.C

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 06:23 AM

Hi Dahmun,

 

Just for interest this is the UK document which I earlier referred -

 

Attached File  yogurt, ice cream, pasteurised milk, process guide.pdf   425.78KB   37 downloads

 

The source link is here -

 

http://dairy.ahdb.or...)/#.V1kJpV4xVnI


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#10 Tony-C

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Posted 09 June 2016 - 11:08 AM

Thank you Charles.

Some good stuff in there but I think the estimated prices are on the low side.

You don't need an homogeniser if you are using homogenised milk/cream or milk powders.

The pasteurization parameters of 90°C for 10 - 15 minutes seem a little excessive.

There is no filtration in the process.

The cooling will be reliant on mains water temperature so that would need to looked (maybe 10°C or less depending on temperature required for the cooled yogurt base).

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony



#11 Dahmun

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Posted 21 June 2016 - 01:52 AM

Thanks for the information Charles C and Tony C. This is exactly what I was looking for.






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