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MPN/g pass fail limits


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#1 itreatpets

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 03:10 PM

Hello everyone!

 

I am trying to determine pass-fail limits with E.coli MPN/g. If you could please point me in the right direction where to find this information, I greatly appreciate it.

 

If it makes a difference it's for an RTE Beef Liver product.

 

TIA



#2 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 04:07 PM

Most RTE products have a "none" detected E. coli standard.

 

There are several standards posted around IFSQN. Here for example: http://www.ifsqn.com...cut-vegetables/

 

No doubt Charles will be here with a master list by the end of the day. :)

 

My personal favorite reference is here: https://www.fsis.usd...pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

That reference states that your generic E. coli spec should be 10CFU/g and that that number should prompt an investigation. As far as STEC goes, even your raw product should be negative in 375g. I would interpret this limit to indicate that anytime you find any generic E. coli it should be cause for investigation, as it should not have survivied your lethality treatment.


Austin Bouck
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Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

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#3 itreatpets

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Posted 19 December 2017 - 06:49 PM

Thank you for the resource's I am reading through them all now. With the little I have read, it's starting to make sense now. 

 

I just want to clarify, MPN/g does not translate to CFU/g in any way correct? Most literature reference CFU/g and that was confusing me some, but after reading how they determine both numbers I don't see any relation of the two.



#4 Charles.C

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 12:59 AM

Hello everyone!

 

I am trying to determine pass-fail limits with E.coli MPN/g. If you could please point me in the right direction where to find this information, I greatly appreciate it.

 

If it makes a difference it's for an RTE Beef Liver product.

 

TIA

 

Hi ITP,

 

Any relevant answer likely depends on the context of yr query. More info might/would help. (petfood by any chance ?? :smile: )

 

JFI - 

 

(1) as indicated by 3F, there are various "types" of E.coli, 2 notable/popular  ones are non-pathogenic, "generic" E.coli and pathogenic E.coli O157

 

So you need to specify which E.coli you are talking about. (At the risk of confusing you even more, can try this short thread if you wish to know more -

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ypes-of-e-coli/

 

(2) Are you referring to processing the item in yr OP or, eg, just some sample from a shop ??? Canada has encyclopedic microbiological Processing Requirements.

 

(3) There may be a Canadian Regulatory Answer for yr specific Product/Process

 

Having offered a few caveats, the following refs may, a big may, relate -

 

Attached File  Canada micro limits - domestic pathogens (and others) in RTE meat productspdf.pdf   98.32KB   10 downloads

(extracted from -

http://www.inspectio...79877376?chap=0

(can also see the introductory article -

http://www.inspectio...19?chap=3#s27c3

(IMEX Canadian authrities change all their URLs every year or more frequently)

 

also, ex google -

Attached File  Canada microbial guidelines RTE Foods,2013.pdf   922.18KB   16 downloads

 

PS - MPN (= most probable number, typically quoted per gram but not always) refers to the micro. procedure used to evaluate the level of bacterium of interest (in this case "E.coli").  You can read it as cfu or, most likely, cfu/gram (ie = yr OP title).

 

PPS - I noticed this quite readable, short, process-oriented compilation while browsing this thread which may be of passing interest -

Attached File  Canada - Ready-to-eat RTE meat processing guidelines.2016.pdf   474.66KB   11 downloads

 

P3S - If around at this time, Scampi may have more locally accurate knowledge ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#5 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 20 December 2017 - 04:26 PM

Thank you for the resource's I am reading through them all now. With the little I have read, it's starting to make sense now. 

 

I just want to clarify, MPN/g does not translate to CFU/g in any way correct? Most literature reference CFU/g and that was confusing me some, but after reading how they determine both numbers I don't see any relation of the two.

 

You can basically consider them interchangable, MPN/ is a statistics based measurement (Most probable number) of bacteria present in the sample based on a repeated series of qualitative tests) while CFU is based on actual colonies counted (colony forming unit). Their meaning is essentially the same, an estimate of the number of organisms per gram. The units just point towards the methodology used to generate that number.


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.




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