Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo

High Temperature Sanitation Test Strips

high temp high temperature heat sanitation dishwasher test strips thermometer paper sanitize

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

bakeryscience

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 116 posts
  • 11 thanks
18
Good

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Cooking and baking, photography, painting, candle making, pets, travel

Posted 24 August 2018 - 07:02 PM

I have been finding a lot of conflicting information online regarding the temperature necessary for the proper sanitation of dishes (using heat only). I've seen some sources that list 180 F and some that list 160 F. Some sources say that the dishes themselves must reach 160 F, which typically requires 180 F water.

 

I recently bought these test strips for documentation of proper temperatures. Will this be sufficient, or does it need to be the version that change colors at 180 F? 

https://paperthermom...abel-160-f-71-c

 

If you need information about that products we make, we bake bread. We use wheat flour (in all products), eggs, milk, and tree nuts in the production of certain breads.   



Scampi

    Fellow

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,745 posts
  • 1010 thanks
650
Excellent

  • Canada
    Canada
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 24 August 2018 - 07:04 PM

what is your pathogen of concern?  different microbes need different time/temps for death


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


Thanked by 1 Member:

bakeryscience

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 116 posts
  • 11 thanks
18
Good

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Cooking and baking, photography, painting, candle making, pets, travel

Posted 24 August 2018 - 07:33 PM

Do we need to address all/any microbes even if we consider them to be of low risk in our hazard analysis? 



bakeryscience

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 116 posts
  • 11 thanks
18
Good

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Cooking and baking, photography, painting, candle making, pets, travel

Posted 24 August 2018 - 08:14 PM

Hmm...I just took a look at the FDA Food Code 4-703.211 (B) on page 149....

 

"Hot water mechanical operations by being cycled through EQUIPMENT that is set up as specified under §§ 4-501.15, 4-501.112, and 4-501.113 and achieving a UTENSIL surface temperature of 71oC (160oF) as measured by an irreversible registering temperature indicator"

 

https://www.fda.gov/...e/ucm595140.pdf



Thanked by 1 Member:

Ryan H.

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 166 posts
  • 56 thanks
38
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Sports, traveling

Posted 24 August 2018 - 09:32 PM

In this case you should probably address the most likely microbes that are most heat resistant. We typically keep our water temperatures at 180 and thus our utensils are reaching an adequate temperature. This has always prove successful for me.

I would also recommend verifying your temperatures show how (daily, weekly? Via a calibrated thermometer) and maybe even a frequency of calibration for your sanitation unit that is washing your dishes?

Things to consider!


All the best, 

 

Ryan Heavner 


SQFconsultant

    SQFconsultant

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 3,747 posts
  • 943 thanks
829
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:American Patriot
    WWG1WGA
    Never give up, never give in - always win!
    Martha's Vineyard Island, Massachusetts

Posted 24 August 2018 - 09:33 PM

This brings back memories of my inspecting automatic dishwashers at Target stores in the states.  Generally speaking in order to achieve a constant 160 the machine needs to run at 180 most of time.  The ones at Target however were set up to boost to 220 so that the temp was adequate at a constant 180.

 

160 did not cut it and if the test strips color came up with anything under 180, the machine was taken out of service.


Edited by SQFconsultant, 24 August 2018 - 09:36 PM.

Kind regards,
Glenn Oster
 
GOC BUSINESS GROUP | SQF System Development, Implementation & Certification Consultants
Internal Auditor Training - eConsultant Retainer Subscriptions - Pre & Post SQF-GAP Audits - Consultant Training
Visit us @ http://www.GlennOster.com  or call us @ 772.646.4115 US-EST 8am-4pm Anyday except Thursday
 
 

FurFarmandFork

    Food Safety Consultant, Production Supervisor

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,264 posts
  • 584 thanks
191
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon, USA

Posted 25 August 2018 - 01:55 PM

What state are you in? As was stated above FDA model food code is as good of a standard as any to confirm your log reduction on clean utensils. Check out your state's regs as well, as Oregon for example had a bunch of other validation qualifiers for whether it was a one or two stage dishwasher, and making sure you were within spec on rinse pressures as well.


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

bakeryscience

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 116 posts
  • 11 thanks
18
Good

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Cooking and baking, photography, painting, candle making, pets, travel

Posted 27 August 2018 - 02:20 PM

I didn't even think about checking with state regs...I'll start looking into that now. We're located in Missouri. 



FurFarmandFork

    Food Safety Consultant, Production Supervisor

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,264 posts
  • 584 thanks
191
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon, USA

Posted 27 August 2018 - 02:46 PM

So there you go, there are requirements for temperature at the manifold depending on equipment below, but ultimately whatever the equipment does it needs to be capable of 160ºf surface temp on the dishes/utensils.

 

I recommend this tool as well for easy verification and not having to inventory chemical indicator strips that tend to wash off in the dishwasher when you use them https://www.thermoworks.com/DishTemp

 

 

 

Missouri

 

Hot water mechanical operations by being cycled through equipment that is set up as specified under §§ 4-501.15, 4-501.112, and 4-501.113 and achieving a utensil surface temperature of one hundred sixty degrees Fahrenheit (160 °F) as measured by an irreversible registering temperature indicator;

 

4-501.19 Manual Warewashing Equipment, Wash Solution Temperature. The temperature of the wash solution in manual warewashing equipment shall be maintained at not less than one hundred ten degrees Fahrenheit (110°F) or the temperature specified on the cleaning agent manufacturer's label instructions.

 

4-501.110 Mechanical Warewashing Equipment, Wash Solution Temperature.

(A)The temperature of the wash solution in spray type warewashers that use hot water to sanitize may not be less than:

(1) For a stationary rack, single temperature machine, one hundred sixty-five degrees Fahrenheit (165°F);

(2) For a stationary rack, dual temperature machine, one hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit (150°F);

(3) For a single tank, conveyor, dual temperature machine, one hundred sixty degrees Fahrenheit (160°F); or

(4) For a multi-tank, conveyor, multi-temperature machine, one hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit (150°F).

(B) The temperature of the wash solution in spray-type warewashers that use chemicals to sanitize may not be less than one hundred twenty degrees Fahrenheit (120°F). 66

 

4-501.111 Manual Warewashing Equipment, Hot Water Sanitization Temperatures. If immersion in hot water is used for sanitizing in a manual operation, the temperature of the water shall be maintained at one hundred seventy-one degrees Fahrenheit (171°F) or above. P

 

4-501.112 Mechanical Warewashing Equipment, Hot Water Sanitization Temperatures.

(A)Except as specified in ¶

(B) of this section, in a mechanical operation, the temperature of the fresh hot water sanitizing rinse as it enters the manifold may not be more than one hundred ninety-four degrees Fahrenheit (194 °F), P or less than:

(1) For a stationary rack, single temperature machine, one hundred sixty-five degrees Fahrenheit (165 °F); P or

(2) For all other machines, one hundred eighty degrees Fahrenheit (180 °F). P

(B) The maximum temperature specified under ¶ (A) of this section, does not apply to the high pressure and temperature systems with wand-type, hand-held, spraying devices used for the in-place cleaning and sanitizing of equipment such as meat saws.

 

4-501.113 Mechanical Warewashing Equipment, Sanitization Pressure. The flow pressure of the fresh hot water sanitizing rinse in a warewashing machine, as measured in the water line immediately downstream or upstream from the fresh hot water sanitizing rinse control valve, shall be within the range specified on the machine manufacturer’s data plate and may not be less than thirty-five (35) kilopascals (five pounds (5 lb) per square inch) or more than two hundred (200) kilopascals (thirty pounds (30 lb) per square inch).


Austin Bouck
Owner/Consultant at Fur, Farm, and Fork.
Consulting for companies needing effective, lean food safety systems and solutions.

Subscribe to the blog at furfarmandfork.com for food safety research, insights, and analysis.

Thanked by 1 Member:

bakeryscience

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 116 posts
  • 11 thanks
18
Good

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Cooking and baking, photography, painting, candle making, pets, travel

Posted 27 August 2018 - 02:57 PM

Thank you!! That DishTemp device would be a great solution.







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users