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Use of Beeswax as a maintenance item

beeswax maintenance anti-corrosion

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#1 JamesT

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Posted 27 September 2018 - 08:57 PM

Hi all,

 

A question came up about using a block of beeswax to coat a metal part on our machinery as an anti-corrosion measure. The machines can go anywhere in North America, and Latin America.Generally I recommend NSF approved maintenance chemicals to be safe.

 

It's confusing because beeswax can be a food ingredient and is used in cosmetics as well. Can this be used so long that there is an MSDS? Maybe even a Certificate of Analysis?

 

My other concern is if a customer uses beeswax they must ensure it is stored in the maintenance area, and labeled such that it never gets mixed up with regular food ingredients.

 

Any thoughts would be much appreciated!



#2 Brendan Triplett

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 08:55 AM

James,

 

You will be good with an MSDS if you like since you are not using it as a food additive.  Just to be clear however it is recognized as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the FDA under the following codes:

 

Beeswax (bleached, white wax) - MISC, GRAS

Beeswax (yellow wax) - MISC, GRAS - 184.1973

Beeswax, white (cire d'abeille) - FL/ADJ, REG, GMP, In conjunction with flavors - 172.510

 

Also there was an FDA Ruling on it:

 

https://www.accessda...cfm?fr=184.1973

 

This should give you all of the evidence you need to use it and keep it on site safely without raising any eyebrows.

 

Cheers!


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#3 Brendan Triplett

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 09:02 AM

Hey James,

 

Here is another site about food grade beeswax.  I think it is important to tell you that if you arte going to be using any products on your production lines that they need to be food safe or completely removable through cleaning.  Beeswax is food safe.

 

http://yourlivingbod...-grade-beeswax/


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#4 JamesT

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 07:07 PM

Thank you so much Brendan for the great information! :)

 

Cheers!



#5 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 28 September 2018 - 10:54 PM

Agree with the above, generally if you can use it as an ingredient it's a great option for indirect use. Just make sure it's that quality and not jimbo's beezwaxxx that may be anything but.

 

I've got a summary article that discusses the various standards to determine whether something is "food grade" or not here that may be helpful for future situations.

 

http://furfarmandfor...-actually-mean/


QA Manager and food safety blogger in Oregon, USA.

 

Interested in more information on food safety and science? Check out Furfarmandfork.com for more insights!

Subscribe to have one post per week delivered straight to your inbox.

 


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#6 JamesT

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 06:01 AM

Thank you for the additional information FurFarmandFork! You have a great website by the way full of great educational reference material. I'll be sure to explore more of it.  

 

Much appreciated.



#7 Brendan Triplett

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 01:14 PM

Hey James,

Wasnt sure if you were getting any pushback or anything when it came to the beeswax but in the event that there are then you could always substitute the beeswax (in the event og a vegan product line or something). I dont think that this is the case but it is always nice to know that there are options. I found this site.

https://www.leaf.tv/...ax-substitutes/


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#8 JamesT

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 05:15 PM

Thanks again Brendan!

 

We haven't received any pushback as it was just an idea within a small group. However, given this information, I will propose that engineering do some trials or research with regards to how effective these waxes actually are. One aspect that was of concern was that the wax may run in hotter climates.

 

This is all very interesting. Much appreciated!



#9 Scampi

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 06:04 PM

Having been at the commissioning of a plant where equipment came from Europe to Canada via a ship, what ever is currently being used was stuck like glue.........we had one h**l of a time removing it......lots of residue in joints etc.

 

But...........equipment was in good shape upon arrival with no corrosion or scratches. The stuff was stainless steel coated, but not solid stainless, so deep scratches were the biggest concern during transit

 

Just FYI to also run trials on it's full removal so you can notify customers regardless of what you are going to use


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#10 JamesT

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 06:32 PM

That's a great point, and it's something that has come up in the past. For this particular case, the wax would be used on a single component that would require the wax to be in place indefinitely to prevent surface corrosion—that's the intent. It's a non-food contact surface and it not above any open product. Due to the engineering design, a very hard steel with a oxide layer must be used. Unfortunately, Stainless Steel isn't an option. 

 

As for preventing rust for long-haul shipments, we use LPS rust inhibitor. It's something we've been using for some time and without complaints to my knowledge. The LPS documentation states removal using a degreaser. How did you manage to remove the 'gunk' that was on your machine(s)? I'd be interested to know!

 

Just in case readers are wondering, LPS was recommended before the beeswax idea came about, but apparently applying the LPS spray on the component is posing an issue as it runs prior to it hardening, and applying prior to installing the component isn't practical. Hence, a wax could theoretically cake on immediately and hopefully not attract corrugate dust so to speak. 



#11 Scampi

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 07:36 PM

repeated cleaning.........the machinery had to be "put together" on site so welding etc had also occurred which contributed to the overall issue but seriously about 3 weeks we kept finding "gunk"  it was in areas that were always filled with water at about 42F so I think that contributed to the problem

 

As for wax not collecting dust.....hmmmmm will this machine be cleaned everyday?  If so, wax sounds like a good option...........if not,it will turn into a dust magnet (i'm thinking my candles at home)

 

Can you not dip the equipment in another metal????


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#12 JamesT

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 07:56 PM

3 weeks of cleaning sounds horrendous!

 

That's a good point about dusty candles...

 

There was talk about coating the component, but only partially as there are other parts that move along this component. Ultimately, this would be the most practical if it worked. No extra wax coating to maintain. However, we do recommend a schedule for light cleaning of the machine, so like you said, the wax could work.

 

Thanks again!



#13 Gerard H.

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Posted 08 October 2018 - 08:40 AM

Dear James,

 

It looks like there is interaction between different metals, movement of electrons, that results in metal degradation of this part of the machine. This means also, that the corrosion comes from the inside of the machine. As Scampi mentioned you could make use of another metal.

 

You can also choose to place an anode or cathode, depending on the electrons flow in the machine to compensate the degradation (corrosion). The disadvantage of this is that the component has to be replaced frequently, when it's "used". But maybe it's a common practice in the machine industry (something that I don't know). Hopefully another forum member can tell us more about.

 

Please note, that the product contamination with food grade lubricants or similar substances used in the industry is unintentional.

 

Kind regards,

 

Gerard Heerkens



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