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Cook Temp. Validation Lyco Cooked Pasta & Retort Diced Potatoes

pasta potato cook temp pathogens

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LivingHealthy86

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 04:09 PM

I am looking for a cook temperature validation study or a regulation quote that states what is efficient enough to kill pathogens on cooked pasta noodles and diced retort potatoes. 



The Food Scientist

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 05:32 PM

You can find some useful info in here:

 

https://ucfoodsafety...iles/224455.pdf

 

Also if you are going to carry this out for your process. Better use a process authority.


Edited by The Food Scientist, 24 January 2020 - 05:39 PM.

Everything in food is science. The only subjective part is when you eat it. - Alton Brown.


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Charles.C

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 05:57 PM

I am looking for a cook temperature validation study or a regulation quote that states what is efficient enough to kill pathogens on cooked pasta noodles and diced retort potatoes. 

 

Hi LH,

 

Yr query is probably answerable from the literature but yr terminologies need some elaboration to enable a meaningful reply.

 

eg - 

 

which pathogen to kill ? UK tends to pick L.mono as most diffficult pathogenic species to kill within the mixture of pathogens which may be found on many foods. US may disagree with this generalisation. Other countries have their own preferences.

 

Kill how many ? (100% is mathematically not feasible). 5-7 log reductions are often specified (pasteurization). 12 log is minimum requirement for sterilisation.

 

If you restate the OP requirements as 6D reduction for L.monocytogenes, the UK (Regulatory) typically uses this food safety generalisation -

 

<< achieving a temperature of 70degC for 2 minutes at the slowest heating point of product will provide a 6D reduction of L.monocytogenes >>


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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