Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Bacillus Cereus in Dried Vegetables

HACCP Hazard Analysis Biological Microbiology Bacillus Cereus Dehydrated Vegetables SQF

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 YNA QA

YNA QA

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 38 posts
  • 5 thanks
13
Good

  • United States
    United States

Posted 14 August 2020 - 05:17 PM

We make dried soups and entree mixes as a small portion of our business.  We are currently reviewing our HACCP plan, raw material hazard analysis specifically, and I'm getting stumped by some of the biological hazard analysis I am coming up with.  Our dried vegetables that we buy in are not tested for Bacillus cereus, which my research shows tends to appear often in dried vegetables.  None of our many suppliers test for B.cereus.  I've also seen many research articles stating that of most vegetables samples, many had B.cereus in some amount.

 

The soups and entrees must be boiled then left to simmer before they are safe to eat.  Is this the control of this bacteria? The end user cook step?

 

Should I push my suppliers to test for B.cereus or is it like Flour suppliers who don't test microbes because there will almost always be some bacteria (E.Coli) in the flour?

 

 

 

Please help!!! :)



#2 kfromNE

kfromNE

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 389 posts
  • 141 thanks
96
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Bicycling, reading, nutrition, trivia

Posted 14 August 2020 - 07:05 PM

We make dried soups and entree mixes as a small portion of our business.  We are currently reviewing our HACCP plan, raw material hazard analysis specifically, and I'm getting stumped by some of the biological hazard analysis I am coming up with.  Our dried vegetables that we buy in are not tested for Bacillus cereus, which my research shows tends to appear often in dried vegetables.  None of our many suppliers test for B.cereus.  I've also seen many research articles stating that of most vegetables samples, many had B.cereus in some amount.

 

The soups and entrees must be boiled then left to simmer before they are safe to eat.  Is this the control of this bacteria? The end user cook step?

 

Should I push my suppliers to test for B.cereus or is it like Flour suppliers who don't test microbes because there will almost always be some bacteria (E.Coli) in the flour?

 

 

 

Please help!!! :)

Cooking your soup will control B. cereus. I wouldn't push them personally.

 

The reason your suppliers aren't likely testing for it - they will say the water activity is low enough to control the hazard.



#3 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 17,489 posts
  • 4864 thanks
949
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 15 August 2020 - 09:50 AM

We make dried soups and entree mixes as a small portion of our business.  We are currently reviewing our HACCP plan, raw material hazard analysis specifically, and I'm getting stumped by some of the biological hazard analysis I am coming up with.  Our dried vegetables that we buy in are not tested for Bacillus cereus, which my research shows tends to appear often in dried vegetables.  None of our many suppliers test for B.cereus.  I've also seen many research articles stating that of most vegetables samples, many had B.cereus in some amount.

 

The soups and entrees must be boiled then left to simmer before they are safe to eat.  Is this the control of this bacteria? The end user cook step?

 

Should I push my suppliers to test for B.cereus or is it like Flour suppliers who don't test microbes because there will almost always be some bacteria (E.Coli) in the flour?

 

 

 

Please help!!! :)

 

Hi YNA,

 

From archives -

 

Hazards

(no process lethal step)

 

heat resistant (sporing) bacteria - B.cereus, C.perfringens

preformed toxins - mycotoxins, S.aureus enterotoxin

Other vegetative bacteria - killed by consumer treatment / hot water > 80degC / v.short holding

 

Control Options

 

1. Raw Materials

(i) A level of C.perfringens of 100/g or B.Cereus 1000/g can lead to poisoning when product abuse follows rehydration.

Level of concern -Medium,    Control Option - Quality assured supplies. batch testing.

(ii) Preformed toxins - (LoC) Low - (CO) Quality Assured Supplies

 

2.Sieve and sort.

prevent contamination with spores - low - housekeeping, drycleaning design

 

3.dispense and mixer

control moisture content, a-  low - maintenance

 

4.batching bins and hopper

control moisture content aw - low - (see below)

prevent contamination with spores - low - keep water out of process area and humidity control

 

5.doser

control moisture content - low -dryclean


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Thanked by 1 Member:




Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: HACCP, Hazard Analysis, Biological, Microbiology, Bacillus, Cereus, Dehydrated, Vegetables, SQF

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users