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Spices Time/Temp for kill step?

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omgdudette

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Posted 23 December 2020 - 08:15 PM

I see the FDA and USDA put time/temp limits for pasteurization regarding juice and milk products.  I believe I've seen it for crabmeat and egg as well.  I was wondering if the FDA has something similar for powdered products like spices and dried herbs? Our manufacturing facility processes dried herbs, fruits and vegetable powders and was wondering if there's a guideline from the FDA. Our current kill step is from the juice guideline (juices with pH of less than 4), modified with a higher temperature for the time. Any help is appreciated, thank you.



TimG

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Posted 23 December 2020 - 08:39 PM

Someone else correct me if I'm wrong, but for a lot of product's you'll have to find an accepted source for your reference information. For example, in the sugar industry we relied heavily on the Codex Alimentarius to give us that type of data. I know for a fact I stumbled across a pretty hefty spices and dried powders section in there.

That's probably not very helpful, sorry. I am one of very few in the office today and I felt the urge to communicate.

 

pHfruit or someone more knowledgeable with that industry will be by shortly to give you some real advice.



kfromNE

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Posted 24 December 2020 - 01:03 PM

I see the FDA and USDA put time/temp limits for pasteurization regarding juice and milk products.  I believe I've seen it for crabmeat and egg as well.  I was wondering if the FDA has something similar for powdered products like spices and dried herbs? Our manufacturing facility processes dried herbs, fruits and vegetable powders and was wondering if there's a guideline from the FDA. Our current kill step is from the juice guideline (juices with pH of less than 4), modified with a higher temperature for the time. Any help is appreciated, thank you.

https://www.astaspice.org/ - is a good source. Not sure if the FDA has anything or not. You could also do a scientific article as well.



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mdesai

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Posted 09 January 2021 - 12:26 AM

Performing validation study can help answer this. We have found that treatment at 95 degree C for 5 minutes in a continuous process system will provide greater than five log reduction of pathogens. We have performed numerous validation studies and confirmed this for many different type of powdered products.



Charles.C

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Posted 09 January 2021 - 04:44 AM

I see the FDA and USDA put time/temp limits for pasteurization regarding juice and milk products.  I believe I've seen it for crabmeat and egg as well.  I was wondering if the FDA has something similar for powdered products like spices and dried herbs? Our manufacturing facility processes dried herbs, fruits and vegetable powders and was wondering if there's a guideline from the FDA. Our current kill step is from the juice guideline (juices with pH of less than 4), modified with a higher temperature for the time. Any help is appreciated, thank you.

 

What is yr current temperature/time ? validated microbiologically for Salmonella, L.monocytogenes ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


rmssan

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 09:02 AM

FDA Risk profile of spices: https://www.fda.gov/...108126/download

ASTA clean safe spices document: https://www.astaspic...dance-document/

 

ASTA has validated microbial reduction techniques, but this does not include dry heat.

Herbs and spices are considered low risk products, and drying renders it shelf stable, but its critical point is the water activity level. On dry heating, 74°C is common kill step for other foods.



Charles.C

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Posted 07 March 2021 - 01:17 PM

FDA Risk profile of spices: https://www.fda.gov/...108126/download

ASTA clean safe spices document: https://www.astaspic...dance-document/

 

ASTA has validated microbial reduction techniques, but this does not include dry heat.

Herbs and spices are considered low risk products, and drying renders it shelf stable, but its critical point is the water activity level. On dry heating, 74°C is common kill step for other foods.

 

Hi rmssan,

 

^^^(red) - Sorry but the (2013) data/conclusions in yr 1st linked file do not support this statement as a  generalisation.

For example, wth respect to Salmonella, compare the prevalence figures and see the discussion for US import/ US retail.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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