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Yeast and molds in white sugar in bags while in transit and storage

Yeast and molds storage transit

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#1 chebar

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 08:46 AM

Hello guys, I would like to get your idea on the growth of YM in sugar. Here's some questions, 1. Can we eliminate the growth of YM in the production area using high steam pressure? 2. What are the characteristics of YM specifically in stored sugar? 3. Will YM increase while in transit and leave the product in the container yard? Thank you guys for the help. Chebar


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#2 mesophile

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 10:16 AM

Good Morning,

 

What type of sugar are we talking about here? Is it refined or unrefined? Is it granulated or pre-granulated? I ask these because its not really the sugar but the moisture content that would be the issue in yeast & mould growth. For example, if the sugar was completely dried refined white sugar in air-tight sealed bags then you can pretty much count no yeast and mould growth permanently. However, introduce moisture and air in to the equation and that where problems can start. 

 

Thanks

 

Simon


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#3 chebar

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 10:47 AM

Hi Sir Simon,

 

Thanks for your quick reply. Our product is white crystalline sugar with a max moisture of 0.10 and color range of 550 - 750 i.u. We pack this in 50 kgs polypropylene bag with lining and sewn at one end. Our in-house YM results show a less than 10 cfu but when it arrives at our client the sugar is rejected because it did not passed their requirement (50 cfu).

 

We are trying to "zero in" on where would probably the occurence of high YM.

 

Thanks.


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#4 mesophile

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Posted 17 March 2014 - 03:12 PM

Good Afternoon,

 

I would look if there is any way moisture is getting in to the packaging during transportation. Moisture = mould. Ask your customer if they could do a moisture test on the delivery along with micro. If the moisture is upward of 0.10% then you know moisture has entered the packaging, and this is your source. 

 

Without seeing the production area it is difficult to give further advice.

 

Kind Regards

 

Simon


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#5 chebar

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 01:27 PM

Hi Sir Simon,

 

Thanks for your advice, hope we can get some comments from other members.


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#6 jaimemillertime

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 02:07 PM

At a past job, I used to do a moisture test on nearly all of our dry ingredients upon arrival and prior to use.  Perhaps you could do a moisture test upon packaging and prior to shipping... also the aforementioned test upon receipt of the ingredient (to compare to your results)... Transport may be the issue.  Our issue, however, was the humidity of our warehouse... it was not an easy fix, but we ended up rearranging everything and it all worked out.


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#7 Tony-C

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 02:33 AM

Hello guys, I would like to get your idea on the growth of YM in sugar. Here's some questions, 1. Can we eliminate the growth of YM in the production area using high steam pressure? 2. What are the characteristics of YM specifically in stored sugar? 3. Will YM increase while in transit and leave the product in the container yard? Thank you guys for the help. Chebar

 

Hi Chebar,

 

I would be wanting to keep the area as dry as possible so high pressure steam would be a no. It would also create condensation that could add to your problems. Fogging with something like a QUAT is common in 'wet' production areas to control Y&M, if you had to do this then I would consider how dry afterwards (dehumidifier?).

 

Have you checked Y&M counts in the environment and packaging?

 

What results is your client getting and check if they are using the same test method.

 

Regards,

 

Tony


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#8 chebar

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 07:58 AM

jaimemillertime & Tony,

Thank you for your inputs. We also have problems with our warehousing i.e. temperature gradient, humidity and capacity. Our sugar product is transported using container vans and shipped by cargo vessels, stays in the shipping yard for sometime before being pulled out by our client  which might contribute also in moisture pick up and thus growth of YM.

 

Your comments,

 

Thanks.


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#9 Tony-C

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Posted 22 March 2014 - 12:33 PM

You didn't answer the previous questions.

 

Are you using standard paper sacks? if so maybe you want to consider plastic lined sacks and make sure you pack in a low humidity atmosphere.

 

Regards,

 

Tony


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#10 chebar

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 05:50 AM

Hi Sir Tony,

 

We did not check YM on our environment but did some tests on our packaging and found less than 10 cfu/g. We packed our sugar in plastic line sacks.

 

Thanks for the help.


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#11 YongYM

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 06:20 AM

Dear chebar:

 

Tony-C is correct. You may need to check the Y&M of the environment. If the surrounding environment is full of spores, your end products may be contaminated.

 

 

Yong


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#12 Charles.C

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 08:30 PM

Dear chebar,

 

You may find Tony's other query is also equally relevant -

 

What results is your client getting and check if they are using the same test method.

 

 

 

the sugar is rejected because it did not passed their requirement (50 cfu).

 

 

Sampling ?

 

Procedure ?

 

Commercial rejection ?

 

Actual buyer results, eg 21,31,49, 50001 ?

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#13 chebar

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 03:46 AM

Hi Sir Charles,

 

Sir Tony's comments are included in my check lists since we will be having an audit by this client this coming April and issues mentioned by Sir Tony will be discussed.

 

Thanks everyone.


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#14 Charles.C

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:49 AM

Dear chebar,

 

Regarding the divergence in seller/buyer data, it is usual for contactual purposes to initially generate a mutually agreed specification, eg for micro.limits.

 

Logically the analytical methodology should also be mutually agreed but is nonetheless often skipped over giving problems later on. Sometimes origin/destination have fundamentally (ie due local norms) different procedures (eg APC incubation temp.) which will often cause differences.

 

In large consignments / money the end result can be good business for an independent, mutually agreed 3rd party evaluation to act as arbitrator.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#15 Oraine

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 06:22 PM

I think you should start by controlling the environs and contact in your facility to limit primary inoculation of spores. Overgrowth may be occurring during transport especially if takes close to 24hrs to get the product delivered.  DO a open plate test to see how much stuff you have floating around in the air and then make your corrections accordingly. Also check your packages and how they are stored because you might just be growing spores. 


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