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Raw Material Decision Tree for Ingredients


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#1 ILANA

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 01:02 PM

Does anyone have a decision tree for ingredients - to decide whether the ingredient is CP or CCP?



#2 Simon

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Posted 03 October 2010 - 07:39 PM

BUMP for Ilana.


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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 03:48 PM

Dear Ilana,

Here are 2 similar but slightly different approaches -

Attached File  Haccp tree for raw material (1).doc   130KB   860 downloads

Attached File  haccp tree for raw material (2).xls   16.5KB   938 downloads


Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#4 Cathy

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 12:18 AM

Here is one I developed with some example comments filled into the form. I find it more important to approach where the hazard is addressed than to say an ingredient itself is a critical item. Hope it is helpful.


Cathy

Attached Files


Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
http://haccpcg.com/

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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 06:31 AM

Dear Cathy,

As you imply, I think the use of a separate ingredient risk assessment is rather rare these days.

I guess the use of a prerequisite format is the most common choice, particularly in view of the ever-expanding lists from GFSI.

For traditional haccp, I normally give a preliminary overview list of inputs with their characteristic hazards (if any) but without any assessment of their risk aspects. The latter are then evaluated at individual steps similar to yourself but with added risk columns which will probably be mandatory if considering ISO 22000 (but not for GFSI I guess). I hv noticed that US layouts often avoid such explicit quantitative details and seem to prefer intuitively judged results. (Maybe Americans prefer mental arithmetic, both methods are equally subjective of course).

Interested to know how a supplier guarantees freedom from buckshot (nice touch :thumbup: ).

Rgds / Charles.C


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#6 Tony-C

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 12:18 PM

I think the use of a separate ingredient risk assessment is rather rare these days.
For traditional haccp, I normally give a preliminary overview list of inputs with their characteristic hazards (if any) but without any assessment of their risk aspects. The latter are then evaluated at individual steps

Rgds / Charles.C


Agreed Charles :thumbup:

Although it may be useful to identify risks, I don't see the whole process and individual process steps being considered.

So taking say storage of raw materials as an example this can provide opportunity for cross-contamination or microbial growth to unacceptable levels.

CODEX:

List all potential hazards associated with each step, conduct a hazard analysis, and consider any measures to control identified hazards


Regards,

Tony

#7 Cathy

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Posted 07 October 2010 - 01:39 PM

The risk columns that address severity etc are not always used. It is often assumed when determining if a hazard is likely, one has considered risk and severity. In many regulatory situations, severity does not apply - if there is a likely risk you must control it.

The ingredient hazard analysis is not intended to stand alone. It is to supplement the actual step by step analysis including all steps. Where an ingredient is identified as a concern, it is then deemed significant to include on the flow chart and hazard analysis when it enters the process and where it is used or may contribute to risk.


Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
http://haccpcg.com/

#8 Tony-C

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Posted 08 October 2010 - 04:24 AM

In many regulatory situations, severity does not apply - if there is a likely risk you must control it.


This may be a function of different terminology, IMO the word "Risk" implies that severity does apply:
Risk - A function of the probability of an adverse health effect and the severity of that effect, consequent to a hazard or hazards in food.

Regards,

Tony

#9 AngiePanghulan

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 07:21 AM

Hi Charles,

 

What is your reference for the raw materials decision tree? Why do we need to assess the raw material is it is significant or insignificant, then re-assess (using the decision tree) if sensitive or not sensitive? Are there cases were the raw material is significant but not sensitive?

 

This is in reply to your answer: my question is for the 2nd attachment.

 

Dear Ilana,

Here are 2 similar but slightly different approaches -

doc.gif  Haccp tree for raw material (1).doc   130KB   846 downloads

excel_icon.gif  haccp tree for raw material (2).xls   16.5KB   919 downloads


Rgds / Charles.C

 


Edited by Charles.C, 06 December 2018 - 08:56 AM.


#10 Charles.C

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 09:39 AM

Hi Charles,

 

What is your reference for the raw materials decision tree? Why do we need to assess the raw material is it is significant or insignificant, then re-assess (using the decision tree) if sensitive or not sensitive? Are there cases were the raw material is significant but not sensitive?

 

This is in reply to your answer: my question is for the 2nd attachment.

 

Hi Angie,

 

You can find trees like the one shown in various texts, eg Practical HACCP by Mortimore et al.

 

The tree is an (optional)  tool to aid evaluation of hazards deriving from the raw materials. "Significant" refers to the hazard, "Sensitive" refers to the RM.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#11 AngiePanghulan

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 10:51 AM

Hi Angie,

 

You can find trees like the one shown in various texts, eg Practical HACCP by Mortimore et al.

 

The tree is an (optional)  tool to aid evaluation of hazards deriving from the raw materials. "Significant" refers to the hazard, "Sensitive" refers to the RM.

 

Hi Charles,

 

Thank you very much for replying to my inquiry. Are there cases where the raw material is significant but not sensitive?



#12 Charles.C

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Posted 06 December 2018 - 12:19 PM

Hi Charles,

 

Thank you very much for replying to my inquiry. Are there cases where the raw material is significant but not sensitive?

 

Hi Angie,

 

Yes, many.

For example, think "cooking".


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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