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#1 Inesa

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 02:29 PM

Hi dear people,

Can anyone help me to find numbers for following parameters these bacteria can survive:
temperature,
water activity,
salt content
pH,
oxigen,
infective dose

It's for study project- making HACCP plan for blue cheese French Roqueforti from unpasteurised milk.
I was trying to find but coulndn't. Please help me I can't anymore Posted ImagePosted Image


Edited by Inesa, 07 March 2011 - 09:20 AM.

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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 06:14 PM

Dear Inesa,

I presume you have access to a decent library.

The obvious first (general) choice Encyclopedia is Bergey (not specifically food oriented of course) but I'm sure you've been there already.

Have you tried Micro-organisms in food 5 ? This is a gold mine of basic data + refs on most of the food-related nasties. I had a quick look at the Google books version and the chapter on Brucella seemed to contain some of the info you sought. But no data for Mycobacterium which is rather surprising.

What is the relevance of yr quoted Mycobacterium subspecies to cheese ? The link I looked at (Jay basic text) seemed to focus more on a different milk subspecies (paratuberculosis} but this is definitely not my area of experience. I haven't looked any further through the milk/cheese textbook arena yet which I presume you hv already done ?

eg Attached File  mycobacterium in cheese from raw milk - 4199.pdf   102.21KB   14 downloads

Rgds / Charles.C


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Charles.C


#3 Inesa

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 08:28 PM

Dear Charles,

yes I have an access to some e-books also articles, I've looked at maybe 10 different chapters I could find and all includes long researches with different food products and different results, I don't have time to analyse all those papers. The other was from a medicinal point of view about brucellosis and methods of detection (if anyone need, I can send those docs) Also looked in the book Modern Microbiology. I didn't look at Bergey , as I haven't heard about it Posted Image Food 5? I didn't look there too.
I found all information about the other bacteria- simple easy quickly , but these two... Posted Image

Thanks Charles, I got some nice cookies here and coffee they will save my life, and I hope I'll finally find those numbers and finish one table tonight. Posted Image

Regards
Inesa

Dear Inesa,

I presume you have access to a decent library.

The obvious first (general) choice Encyclopedia is Bergey (not specifically food oriented of course) but I'm sure you've been there already.

Have you tried Micro-organisms in food 5 ? This is a gold mine of basic data + refs on most of the food-related nasties. I had a quick look at the Google books version and the chapter on Brucella seemed to contain some of the info you sought. But no data for Mycobacterium which is rather surprising.

What is the relevance of yr quoted Mycobacterium subspecies to cheese ? The link I looked at (Jay basic text) seemed to focus more on a different milk subspecies (paratuberculosis} but this is definitely not my area of experience. I haven't looked any further through the milk/cheese textbook arena yet which I presume you hv already done ?

eg Attached File  mycobacterium in cheese from raw milk - 4199.pdf   102.21KB   14 downloads

Rgds / Charles.C


Just as appetite comes by eating, so work brings inspiration, if inspiration is not discernible at the beginning. (Igor Stravinsky)

#4 Inesa

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Posted 02 March 2011 - 08:55 PM

And your last question. Humans are susceptible to animal borne tuberculosis- Mycobacterium tuberculosis what you find in the milk of infected animals. The other one- Map is suspected having influence on Crohn's desease. So I don't want them in my cheese Posted Image


Just as appetite comes by eating, so work brings inspiration, if inspiration is not discernible at the beginning. (Igor Stravinsky)

#5 Inesa

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 11:52 AM

Sorry for disturbing again, but I found out that Mycobacterium and Brucella are strictly controlled within herds and infected animals and it's stated that EU countries are free of it, so no occurrence Posted Image Posted Image


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 12:47 PM

Dear Inesa,

Sorry for disturbing again, but I found out that Mycobacterium and Brucella are strictly controlled within herds and infected animals and it's stated that EU countries are free of it, so no occurrence


And you hv an EC-wide validation for this ?

(other than a statement by EU perhaps ? :smile: )

It reminds me of a statement a few years back that no chickens in Sweden are contaminated by Salmonella (though the historical incidence is indeed extremely low due to the control procedures).

Rgds / Charles.C

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Charles.C


#7 Inesa

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 08:56 PM

Dear Inesa,



And you hv an EC-wide validation for this ?

(other than a statement by EU perhaps ? :smile: )

It reminds me of a statement a few years back that no chickens in Sweden are contaminated by Salmonella (though the historical incidence is indeed extremely low due to the control procedures).

Rgds / Charles.C



I found this in a chapter 23 Brucella (by Sascha Al Dahouk, Karsten Nockler, Herbert Tomaso) from a e-book (don't remember now book name, saved in the university. pc)
citation page 319:

''Bovine brucellosis has been successfully eradicated in Canada, Japan, northern Europe and Australia. In the EU, Sweeden, Denmark, Finland, Germany, The UK (except for Northern Ireland), Austria, The Netherland, Belgium, and Luxembourg are approved as "officially free from bovine and ovine/caprine brucellosis.'' 40
Norway and Switzerland are also considered to be brucellosis-free. In contrast, the situation is less favorable in Southern European countries. 41


40. Godfroid, J.and Kasbohrer. Brucellosis in the EUand Norway at the turn of the twenty-first century, 2002.
41. Taleski, V. et al. An overview of of the epidemiology of brucellosis in selected countries of Central and the Southeast Europe. 2002

I didn't find any validation for Mycobacterium yet, but it should be somewhere Posted Image as in some papers it stated as a very highly controlled pathogen and if I get it correctly- is the responsibility of the farmers, not cheese producers.

p.s No, probably I'm wrong. Eu legislation states that all responsibility lays on food producer Posted Image



Edited by Inesa, 03 March 2011 - 09:26 PM.

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#8 Tony-C

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:08 PM

I didn't find any validation for Mycobacterium yet, but it should be somewhere Posted Image as in some papers it stated as a very highly controlled pathogen and if I get it correctly- is the responsibility of the farmers, not cheese producers.


Processors in the UK have tended to extend their holding time to 25 seconds from 15 seconds minimum as a consequence of reports that 15 seconds was insufficient to kill Mycobacterium avium sub species paratuberculosis.

Regards,

Tony

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#9 Inesa

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:18 PM

Processors in the UK have tended to extend their holding time to 25 seconds from 15 seconds minimum as a consequence of reports that 15 seconds was insufficient to kill Mycobacterium avium sub species paratuberculosis.

Regards,

Tony


Thanks Tony,
if you have any ideas about raw milk cheese with Penicillium roqueforti please share. We don't have any heat treatment, final product pH arround 5 Posted Image





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#10 Charles.C

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 09:48 PM

Dear Inesa,

Well, for bovine brucellosis, approx. 20-25% of countries in EC were "not officially free" (nice choice of words) at end of 2009 . Couldn't see any data after that.

Attached File  final_report_2009_10012011_cover_en.pdf   8.26MB   19 downloads

Can see some intriguing parallels with overall brucellosis case statistics in 2006 ( > double above level)
Attached File  brucellosis up to 2006 en.pdf   20.51KB   4 downloads

@Tony - is the subsp.paratuberculosis more heat resistant than subsp.avium [latter may be irrelevant to cheese anyway of course :smile: ]
Rgds / Charles.C


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#11 Tony-C

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 10:17 PM

@Tony - is the subsp.paratuberculosis more heat resistant than subsp.avium [latter may be irrelevant to cheese anyway of course :smile: ]
Rgds / Charles.C


As far as I understand avium and tuberculosis are species, paratuberculosis is a subspecies of avium. Reports suggest that MAP is quite durable so personally I would be looking to give it a knock out punch in the pasteurisation process but if you know better I'd be glad to hear it.

Regards,

Tony

#12 Charles.C

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 11:36 PM

Dear TonyC

http://en.wikipedia....ium_avium_avium

http://www.jwildlife...stract/42/4/724

I confess that some of these subtleties far escape me but there does appear to be a differential meaning involved in the maze somewhere. :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C


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#13 Inesa

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 04:13 PM

Hi guys thanks for comments, Charles I'll download your documents when kids are sleeping and look there.
It would be a much easier project with cheese from pasteurised milk, so of course teacher gave one for unpasteurized... So I can't kill those germs by heat treatment I need to find another way how to control them.

I'm thinking about a special control of a farm I would buy milk from, kind of agreement that milk is onlly from healthy cows. I don't know anything about what's going on in farm level and what responsibilities they have. I think there must be a special governmental veterinary control of farms maybe even vaccination of animals in order to prevent the spread of these dangerous bacteria.

I'll be back, if I find something interresting... Posted Image


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#14 Charles.C

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Posted 04 March 2011 - 09:10 PM

dear Inesa,

one more to try -

Attached File  haccp cheese via raw milk - 02-Heggum.pdf   379.08KB   7 downloads

the author has published many cheese/iso 22000 items

rgds / Charles.C


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#15 Inesa

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Posted 06 March 2011 - 07:21 PM

Yahoo I found it!!!! Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

Here is some law, probably also relevant for British and others in EU:

1- Brucella (Anex I)

amending Decision 93/52/EEC recording the compliance by certain Member States of regions with
the requirements relating to brucellosis (Brucella melitensis) and according them the status of a
Member State or region officially free of the disease

http://eur-lex.europ...028:0029:EN:PDF

2- Mycobacterium tuberculosisb (Anex I )


amending for the fourth time Decision 1999/467/EC establishing the officially tuberculosis-free
status of bovine herds of certain Member States or regions of Member States

http://eur-lex.europ...018:0019:EN:PDF



and Charles, thanks for last slides Posted Image , I had them from 2008 some small exercise, have totally forgotten them Posted Image


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#16 Inesa

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 09:18 AM

If I look at REGULATION (EC) No 853/2004
http://eur-lex.europ...20100715:EN:PDF



SECTION IX: RAW MILK, COLOSTRUM, DAIRY PRODUCTS AND COLOSTRUM-BASED PRODUCTS
Chapter 1:

2. (a) In particular, as regards brucellosis, raw milk and colostrum must come from:
(i) cows or buffaloes belonging to a herd which, within the meaning of Directive 64/432/EEC (1), is free or officially free of brucellosis;

(1) Council Directive 64/432/EEC of 26 June 1964 on animal health problems affecting intra-Community trade in bovine aimals and swine (OJ 121, 29.7.1964, p. 1977/64). Directive as last amended by Regulation (EC) No 21/2004 (OJ L 5, 9.1.2004, p. 8).



(b) As regards tuberculosis, raw milk and colostrum must come from:
(i) cows or buffaloes belonging to a herd which, within the meaning of Directive 64/432/EEC, is officially free of tuberculosis; or
(ii) females of other species belonging, for species susceptible to tuberculosis, to herds regularly checked for his disease under a control plan that the competent authority has approved.


A very useful information about requirements to get off.free status for Brucellosis and Turbecullosis, including methods of detection and many other useful stuff in COUNCIL DIRECTIVE of 26 June 1964 on animal health problems affecting intra-Community trade in bovine animals and swine (64/432/EEC).
http://eur-lex.europ...20091218:EN:PDF

Regarding to Official approved Member states, following documents I found (not amendments as I have uploaded in my previous post)
Brucellosis (consolidated version 2010):
http://eur-lex.europ...20101119:EN:PDF

Tuberculosis (last consolidated version 2001, a bit old... I'm not sure if there is another new decision)
http://eur-lex.europ...20010111:EN:PDF


Just as appetite comes by eating, so work brings inspiration, if inspiration is not discernible at the beginning. (Igor Stravinsky)




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