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Mould and Yeast in Chocolate milk product

chocolate milk spoilage mould yeast microbiological quality

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#1 carinaevora

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 11:28 AM

Hello.

 

I'm investigating some spoilage in chocolate milk. And i decided to use PDA and see what would grow. The petri dish were incubated at 35 C and 25 C. The dilitiuons were 10^-1 till 10^-6.

At 35 C there were growth of yeast at 10^-1 dillution.

At 25 C there were growth of moulds and yeasts at 10^-1 as you can see in the image IMG_3743 and 10^-2 ; and two yellow colony in 10^-6 as you can see in the image IMG_3745. I did not manage to identify it yet.

Can you help me to identify the yellow colony? what can cause it?

Also, the strcture of the yellow one in IMG_3743 is diferent from the one in IMG_3745. The fisrt one looks like flower spores and the second one is more compact. 

 

I'm also doing experiments to identify bacteria (using PCA). 

 

Thank you.

 

Attached File  IMG_3743.JPG   68.26KB   0 downloads

Attached File  IMG_3745.JPG   45.63KB   0 downloads



#2 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 03:15 PM

Unfortunately it normally isn't possible to identify molds based only on colony appearance on generic media. You need microscopy to look at the fruiting bodies and cell structure. I'd reach out to an ISO accredited lab and see if they can provide ID for you.

 

Ultimately your spoilage is more likely to do with poor sanitation at the filler, incomplete pasteurization, or unsanitary packaging materials (containers and closures). I'd check mold levels on all of those points and see where it may be coming from. More samples will be better, as it may not be at high levels.


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#3 Scampi

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 03:19 PM

it looks similar to Meruliporia incrassata mold spores at first glance


Because we always have is never an appropriate response!


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#4 carinaevora

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Posted 27 March 2018 - 03:47 PM

Unfortunately it normally isn't possible to identify molds based only on colony appearance on generic media. You need microscopy to look at the fruiting bodies and cell structure. I'd reach out to an ISO accredited lab and see if they can provide ID for you.

 

Ultimately your spoilage is more likely to do with poor sanitation at the filler, incomplete pasteurization, or unsanitary packaging materials (containers and closures). I'd check mold levels on all of those points and see where it may be coming from. More samples will be better, as it may not be at high levels.

 

Thank you for the reply.

 

I did today swab of all that, and ambient petri dish. 

I'm analysing also bacteria growth: no thermophillic bacteria; waiting for other results.







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