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What do you include in your Environmental Plan?

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#1 MrsPowell

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 06:36 PM

Hello All,

I am new here and was needing help with an Environmental Plan. What do your company usually test for micro-wise? How often do you test? Examples of Environmental plan is a plus. Thanks



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 11:52 PM

Hello All,

I am new here and was needing help with an Environmental Plan. What do your company usually test for micro-wise? How often do you test? Examples of Environmental plan is a plus. Thanks

 Pls clarify a little.

 

Which/Whose EP are you referring to ?


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 012117

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Posted 19 November 2018 - 11:57 PM

Hi, MrsPowell.

 

For EMP, the micro that should be tested should be in parallel with your product. In example, you will not test micro A if your product will not support the growth of micro A. The frequecy also depends on your risk and the limits also based on the risk.

 

For example, Ive been into plant where the limit for EB is <10cfu/swab (plant A) for zone 2 and another plant with limit of <100cfu/swab (plant B). The frequency for plant A is 2x a week while for plant B is once a week. The difference is based on the risk assessment that if the during the manufacture of the product, the process/product is susceptible for micro contamination (e.g. difference on cleaning, how open the line is, etc..) or if along the shelf life of the product, it may support growth.



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#4 trubertq

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 10:42 AM

Risk assessment for frequency is always advisable. I found a good example for a  risk assessment which is attached. It is produced by Microgen who are trying to sell you products but nevertheless it's a good place to start.

The organisms will depend on the product you are producing and what organisms are likely to occur but start with TVC, E coli and Staph aureus as the very basic I would have thought. 

Attached Files


I'm entitled to my opinion, even a stopped clock is right twice a day

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#5 MrsPowell

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 01:32 PM

We are under BRC. From previous companies we tested for listeria and salmonella. We produce candy at this location. Our shelf life is 2 years.


Edited by Charles.C, 08 December 2018 - 12:37 AM.


#6 LSB

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 08:41 PM

You do not have to test for pathogens...necessarily. ATP is another great alternative based on your plants risk. set your CFU's up to 500 or whatever number you want, and just plate ATP and generic Ecoli/coliform. 

the bad thing about environmental pathogen testing is what do you do when a test pops positive?......all of that product is implicated. just my .02



#7 Charles.C

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 10:24 PM

We are under BRC. From previous companies we tested for listeria and salmonella. We produce candy at this location. Our shelf life is 2 years.

 

Do you mean already certified to brc ?

 

Presumably you need to respond to  PRP clause 2.2. and clauses like 4.11.2.

 

And Regulatory requirements, if any ?? I anticipate that in USA / RTE there will be.

 

Basically it comes down to (a) micro for Validation/Verification of Cleaning/Sanitation and (b) micro for Ve of excluding pathogenic contamination.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 frankquinn85

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 01:53 PM

A environmental management  plan will more often than not require announcing courses of action for two purposes. The depiction of announcing necessities ought to include: a rundown of required reports including where fitting observing, ecological occurrences, resistance, remedial activity and examining.



#9 MsMars

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 04:31 PM

You do not have to test for pathogens...necessarily. ATP is another great alternative based on your plants risk. set your CFU's up to 500 or whatever number you want, and just plate ATP and generic Ecoli/coliform. 

the bad thing about environmental pathogen testing is what do you do when a test pops positive?......all of that product is implicated. just my .02

 

One should still be testing for indicators such as Listeria spp. in ready-to-eat products. ATP and generic coliform testing aren't going to cut the mustard when FDA comes in for a swab-a-thon and discover a pathogen harborage problem that you are completely oblivious to.



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#10 LSB

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 07:30 PM

MsMars,

Just depends on the setting of the environment, product, and inherent risks. My particular circumstance does not involve a RTE product, and  i do not fall  under FDA; so i am unable to speak directly with those requirements. 



#11 MsMars

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 07:58 PM

MsMars,

Just depends on the setting of the environment, product, and inherent risks. My particular circumstance does not involve a RTE product, and  i do not fall  under FDA; so i am unable to speak directly with those requirements. 

 

I do understand that the assessment of the product and process determines an environmental program's scope. OP advised candy production, so this particular situation involves RTE-associated inherent risks that should be addressed.  You are right that she does not *have* to test for pathogens but in RTE, testing for indicator organisms should be included in an environmental program for RTE-associated pathogen risks.  ATP testing is generally only a sanitation verification.



#12 Charles.C

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 12:48 AM

Hi MrsPowell,

 

So was yr OP query Regulatory oriented or a specific BRC clause ? Or both ?

 

For the former / RTE/ USA I suspect "some" Listeria involvement is unavoidable. The initial overall risk assessment (eg pathogens) often focuses on RTE / raw material type / wet or dry process. Numerous detailed  EMPs for the previous variables have been posted here.

 

For the latter, see Post 7, eg was there a specific BRC clause involved ?

 

Also can try this thread although not RTE-specific so theoretically might be less demanding. However ..........

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...ng-environment/


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#13 mgourley

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 02:36 AM

Depends on your product and the legislation you may operate under.

 

Determine the risks, determine the tests you want to pay for. 
You have to determine risk first. If you don't know what the risks are, you can't implement an "Environmental Plan".

 

Maybe if you gave more specifics about your process?

 

Marshall







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