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Bulk frozen bread rolls weights

weight bread rolls bulk

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#1 Ieatcookies

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 03:09 PM

Hiya, I have a supplier from EU who brings to us (UK) bulk bread rolls (frozen) and we act as a distributor. The supplier provides the weights in the format below:Net weight: 5.3kg (73x73g+/-3g). Recent delivery shows that the net weight of the product is 5.2kg, and my question - is this ok or below the weight? I am not sure if for the bulk bread rolls they must comply with the quantity? Do they have to show the e-mark for average weight? are they ok with the statement of 73+/-3g, and then the minimum weight is actually 5.110kg? Please help.



#2 Scampi

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Posted 14 January 2021 - 05:04 PM

Hopefully this helps

https://www.gov.uk/w.../packaged-goods


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#3 Ieatcookies

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Posted 15 January 2021 - 12:36 PM

Hi Scampi, 

 

thanks for this. Yes, i thought there are only 2 ways in UK: minimum weight and average weight (i am familiar with the weights and measures law), but they claim (not sure why, therefore the question), they are not packaged goods, because they are selling bulk. they claim they go with 'target weight' and they say i should go to the specification and calculate the minimum weight (never came across the term - target weight). i tried to look for legislation to support their case, the only one i have found was ' the weights and measures (miscellaneous foods) order 1988' https://www.legislat.../1988/2040/made. no mention about average or minimum  weight in the legislation.

   

#4 Scampi

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Posted 15 January 2021 - 01:08 PM

Actually-if they were all 70 gr (-3g) then the total allowable would be 4.9 kg  so I believe that 1) your shipment is within spec and 2) within legal tolerance

 

This is the piece I'd be focusing on to push back on the vendor. So since your the importer and your customer is the final consumer-the cartons MUST be the regulatory requirement.  And I would also be pushing back on the legislated weights in the classification of packaged goods-to me they clearly fall into the category.

Labelling

Packers and importers must ensure that packaged goods are labelled with quantity. The information must be visible, easy to read and not be able to be damaged.

Three Packers Rules

These set out 3 rules that packers and importers must comply with:

  1. The contents of the packages must not be less on average than the nominal quantity
  2. The proportion of packages which are short of the stated quantity by more than a defined amount (the ‘tolerable negative error’) should be less than a specified level
  3. No package should be short by twice the tolerable negative error

They provide protection for consumers on short measure.

Food labelling

Businesses must comply with the mandatory quantity labelling requirements of EU Regulation No 1169/2011 on the provision of food information to consumers (FIC) which have direct effect in the UK.

For further information on the requirements and how to comply please read our food information to consumers: quantity labelling guide.


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#5 Ieatcookies

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 04:53 PM

Hi Scampi, 

 

I was reading your comment and somehow another question came up. If they must comply with the 3 packers rule, should they not be having the e-mark on the packaging (this is what i am concerned - currently no e-mark). if no, and the '73g+3g' format states the average weight compliance, then i guess the whole box should not be less than the average? as per: 

  1. The contents of the packages must not be less on average than the nominal quantity

 

this is so confusing. 



#6 Scampi

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 05:44 PM

The "e" mark is now voluntary

 

See link https://www.gov.uk/g... packaged goods.

 

As for the average --the is a % out side the allowable tolerance-see below

Average system

You can pack your products to an average measurement that is on the label. You must check your packages to make sure a random sample is packed to meet all these rules - known as the ‘three packers’ rules’:

  • the contents of the packages must not be less, on average, than the weight on the label
  • only a small number can fall below a certain margin of error, known as the ‘tolerable negative error’ (TNE)
  • no package can be underweight by more than twice the TNE
Quantity in grams and millilitres TNE as % of quantity TNE in grams or millilitres 5 to 50 9 n/a 50 to 100 n/a 4.5 100 to 200 4.5 n/a 200 to 300 n/a 9 300 to 500 3 n/a 500 to 1,000 n/a 15 1,000 to 10,000 1.5 n/a 10,000 to 15,000 n/a 150 more than 15,000 1 n/a

If you’re calculating the TNE as a percentage of the quantity, you must round up the weight or volume to the nearest 0.10 of a gram or millilitre.


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