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Are sanitizers considered food-grade chemicals?

Sanitation Chemical Control

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Jon19

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Posted 05 December 2021 - 06:16 PM

Are sanitizers considered food-grade chemicals? We are BRC certificated and auditor in one of our audits stated that food-grade lubricants and sanitizers need to be stored separately. This was not cited in previous years’ audits and understand auditors may not have enough time to look at everything and may not audit the same.

We had these materials categorized the sameand stored in the same cabinet.



Charles.C

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 07:02 AM

Are sanitizers considered food-grade chemicals? We are BRC certificated and auditor in one of our audits stated that food-grade lubricants and sanitizers need to be stored separately. This was not cited in previous years’ audits and understand auditors may not have enough time to look at everything and may not audit the same.

We had these materials categorized the same and stored in the same cabinet.

Hi Jon,

 

I deduce you meant separated from each other ?

 

What kind of sanitizer ?

 

"Food Grade" is a popular but sometimes misleading terminology for both sanitizers and especially lubricants.

 

IMEX yr auditor was correct, IMO it is preferable to keep machine-related chemicals stored/locked within the engineering department.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


MMKlein

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 10:24 AM

Hi,

 

I presume they have to be stored separately. 

Food grade lubrificants are used when have any probability of incidental contact with the food. If any amount of that lubrificant is in your finished good, there is no problem.

 

The sanitizer are use to clean your equipament and they shoulnd't be in your finished good



Scampi

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 01:55 PM

For further clarification, all non food (read if it's not a processing aid) must be stored in a controlled area (that you need a key or code to get into)

 

Food grade sanitizers would be sanitizers that are approved for use (within proper dilutions) on food contact equipment

 

 

All GFSI's require that ALL chemicals (unless it's a processing aid) be stored in a controlled area

 

And as Charles pointed out, maintenance chemicals should be locked in the maintenance area(s)


Please stop referring to me as Sir/sirs


Charles.C

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 04:29 PM

Hi,

 

I presume they have to be stored separately. 

Food grade lubrificants are used when have any probability of incidental contact with the food. If any amount of that lubrificant is in your finished good, there is no problem.

 

The sanitizer are use to clean your equipament and they shoulnd't be in your finished good

Hi MMKlein,

 

^^^(red) Sorry but these 2 statements are respectively incorrect/incomplete.

 

Food contaminants / acceptability / terminologies is a complex topic but, just for an example, here is one quote from a specific lubricant supplier -

 

An oil or grease qualifies as an NSF H1 food grade lubricant when, in the event of a contamination, it is present in no more than 10 mg per kg of the foodstuff in question and must not cause any physiological hazard or affect the food’s odor and taste in any way

.

Maybe have a look at the lengthy discussions/references/cross-links starting here -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...ls/#entry129896

(a few of the links have broken due age - sorry for that)


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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MMKlein

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 05:56 PM

Hi MMKlein,

 

^^^(red) Sorry but these 2 statements are respectively incorrect/incomplete.

 

Food contaminants / acceptability / terminologies is a complex topic but, just for an example, here is one quote from a specific lubricant supplier -

 

.

Maybe have a look at the lengthy discussions/references/cross-links starting here -

 

https://www.ifsqn.co...ls/#entry129896

(a few of the links have broken due age - sorry for that)

 

Thank you for the complement! ;)



Sam D

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Posted 06 December 2021 - 07:19 PM

I feel the auditor is correct in this case. 

 

I have always stored the food sanitizers with other cleaning chemicals in a locked cage/ or limited access room.

The food grade lubricants is stored in a separate cabinet along with other food grade maintenance chemicals inside the shop.

 

-Sam



Jon19

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 05:58 PM

Thank you all for the feedback and your perspective is appreciated. 

 

Following up, what is typical for chemicals that come in large totes and/or drums? Totes with Caustic & Acid are currently out in the open next to our CIP skid with wands inserted from our CIP skid to draw in chemical. Totes are not currently fenced, etc to prohibit access. Similarly we have drums that are exposed with hand pumps, under racking near finished product. Materials are all on spill pallets. 



Scampi

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 07:50 PM

Lock them up, all of it, its a GFSI requirement (all codes)

 

This is re; food fraud and intentional adulteration


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TimG

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Posted 07 December 2021 - 08:49 PM

I'll chime in because I ran into this very same issue in my plant this week. During my internal inspection, I found a no rinse (with extreme dilution) food contact sanitizer in the food grade (H1) cabinet.

The maintenance manager and I got into a bit of a 'discussion' (we get along great, it wasn't an issue) and he reminded me that I told him this stuff was food grade in the past (I don't recall using that wording, but to him it's semantics). But here's the deal, at the end of the day this stuff is POISON in its non-dilute concentrated form. Needs to be locked up (controlled), end of story. This is especially important with food defense.

For drums/totes of stuff, most GFSI plants will get a lockable cage if they can't dedicate a lockable room for them. They are cheap(ish) on McMasterCarr or even Grainger.



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