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L.monocytogenes in frozen raw squid

Listeria squid rings

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#1 TEJUSAN

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 05:59 AM

Hi all, 

I request you people to help me in finding a solution for the frequent positive result for Listeria monocytogenes in our ready to cook raw frozen breaded squid rings. We have tried many ways and at the end of the day literally all the consignments gets detected with L.monocytogenes. I hope someone will suggest a fairly better solution for the issue, 

 

Thank you, 



#2 Charles.C

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 07:32 AM

Hi all, 

I request you people to help me in finding a solution for the frequent positive result for Listeria monocytogenes in our ready to cook raw frozen breaded squid rings. We have tried many ways and at the end of the day literally all the consignments gets detected with L.monocytogenes. I hope someone will suggest a fairly better solution for the issue, 

 

Thank you, 

 

L.monocytogenes is regarded as a ubiquitous environmental contaminant.

 

At one time the USFDA set it as a zero tolerance pathogen in imported raw seafood. Then shortly proscribed it in  RTE products only.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 06:47 PM

Determine if it's coming in your raw ingredients or not. That would be the first step into getting to root cause. Don't spin in circles on environmental until you have eliminated the raw material as an issue.


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 10:46 PM

Hi konnen,

 

I agree with 3F. You need to do some quantitative measurements. When taken from the sea, L.mono should be negative. The contamination source is sadly the subsequent "environment". Plus opportunities for bacterial multiplication.

 

FDA and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s L. monocytogenes risk assessment indicates that approximately 8% of raw seafood are contaminated with from 1 to 1000  colony forming unit (CFU)/g and that approximately 91% are contaminated at less than 1 CFU/g. Less than 1% of raw seafood are contaminated at levels greater than 1000 CFU/g and none at levels greater than 10^6  CFU/g.

 

IMEX the 8% is probably optimistic but will vary with the product / presentation / specific environment / supply chain.

 

I hope that yr Product Specification does not claim something like  "L.mono undetected in 25g" since IMEX that will be simply unrealistic and likely to be disproved.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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