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BRCGS 5.4.3-5.4.4 - Raw material vulnerability assessment

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Mccabanero

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Posted 20 March 2023 - 01:20 AM

Hello,

 

I currently work at a small facility that produces rte crackers (what is normally used in charcuterie boards) and is getting ready from changing our oil from canola to EVOO...

 

Currently, regardless of RA - we require visual inspection and COAs for all rm at receipt... Now i know that EVOO is high risk for adulteration and was wondering what kind of control measures/ action plans have other facilities put in place for EVOO?

 

What about for anyone that uses butter and spices?

 

Thank you in advance!



Charles.C

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Posted 20 March 2023 - 05:28 AM

Hello,

 

I currently work at a small facility that produces rte crackers (what is normally used in charcuterie boards) and is getting ready from changing our oil from canola to EVOO...

 

Currently, regardless of RA - we require visual inspection and COAs for all rm at receipt... Now i know that EVOO is high risk for adulteration and was wondering what kind of control measures/ action plans have other facilities put in place for EVOO?

 

What about for anyone that uses butter and spices?

 

Thank you in advance!

Apparently EVOO is extra virgin olive oil.


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


Tony-C

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Posted 20 March 2023 - 05:47 AM

Hi Mccabanero,

 

It would depend on the supply chain and history with the supplier. Assuming it is a new raw material I would be maximising controls as per BRCGS Global Standard for Food Safety Issue 9 clauses:

3.5.1 Management of suppliers of raw materials and packaging

3.5.2 Raw material and packaging acceptance, monitoring and management procedures

 

BRCGS Global Standard for Food Safety Issue 9 Clause 5.4.4 Guidance states:

Depending on the perceived risk, assurance controls may include:

• certificates of analysis from raw material suppliers

raw material testing

• supply chain audits

use of tamper evidence or seals on incoming raw materials

• enhanced supplier approval checks

• mass balance exercises at the raw material supplier

 

I would be testing each batch coming in to develop a level of confidence in the product/supplier.

 

I would do the same with Butter initially but may be easier to manage especially if you can source close to home.

 

Regarding Spices some useful info here: Guidance on Authenticity of Herbs and Spices - Industry Best Practice on Assessing and Protecting Culinary Dried Herbs and Spices

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony



Charles.C

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Posted 20 March 2023 - 06:05 AM

JFI -

 

According  to  the  Draft  Report  on  the  Food  Crisis,  Fraud  in  the  Food  Chain  and  the  Control Thereof (2013/2091 (INI)) (European Parliament, 2013), the top 10 food products most at risk of adulteration or substitution are as follows:

•olive oil

•fish
•organic products
•milk
•grains
•honey and maple syrup
•coffee and tea
•spices (such as saffron and chilli powder)
•wine
•certain fruit juices

 

eg replacing or substituting ingredients with cheaper alternatives (e.g. undeclared substitution of extra-virgin olive oil with lower grades of olive oil or oils of other botanical origin)

 

(BRC)

The Fraud Potential of this specific Product is analysed in some detail in this Guidance document -

Attached File  IFS Food Fraud-Guide,2018.pdf   3.18MB   85 downloads


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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Tony-C

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Posted 20 March 2023 - 06:48 AM

According  to  the  Draft  Report  on  the  Food  Crisis,  Fraud  in  the  Food  Chain  and  the  Control Thereof (2013/2091 (INI)) (European Parliament, 2013), the top 10 food products most at risk of adulteration or substitution are as follows:

•olive oil

•fish
•organic products
•milk
•grains
•honey and maple syrup
•coffee and tea
•spices (such as saffron and chilli powder)
•wine
•certain fruit juices

 

Thank you Charles for this and the guide.

 

I am somewhat surprised that wine wasn't higher up on that list. I would also add red meat, for example: Horse Meat Substitution for Beef Scandal  :smile:

 

EU Knowledge Centre for Food Fraud and Quality publishes Monthly Food Fraud Summary Reports and can be used to keep up to date with the latest news on food fraud incidents

 

Food Fraud Summary February 2023 was published last Friday.

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony



Mccabanero

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Posted 20 March 2023 - 01:13 PM

Hi Mccabanero,

 

It would depend on the supply chain and history with the supplier. Assuming it is a new raw material I would be maximising controls as per BRCGS Global Standard for Food Safety Issue 9 clauses:

3.5.1 Management of suppliers of raw materials and packaging

3.5.2 Raw material and packaging acceptance, monitoring and management procedures

 

BRCGS Global Standard for Food Safety Issue 9 Clause 5.4.4 Guidance states:

Depending on the perceived risk, assurance controls may include:

• certificates of analysis from raw material suppliers

raw material testing

• supply chain audits

use of tamper evidence or seals on incoming raw materials

• enhanced supplier approval checks

• mass balance exercises at the raw material supplier

 

I would be testing each batch coming in to develop a level of confidence in the product/supplier.

 

I would do the same with Butter initially but may be easier to manage especially if you can source close to home.

 

Regarding Spices some useful info here: Guidance on Authenticity of Herbs and Spices - Industry Best Practice on Assessing and Protecting Culinary Dried Herbs and Spices

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony

Hi Tony,

 

First of - thank you for providing that guidance on herbs and spices - definitely helpful...

 

As for the olive oil - I don't think testing each batch is attainable considering that purity testing is complex and costly.



Charles.C

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Posted 20 March 2023 - 10:50 PM

Hi Tony,

 

First of - thank you for providing that guidance on herbs and spices - definitely helpful...

 

As for the olive oil - I don't think testing each batch is attainable considering that purity testing is complex and costly.

Hi Mcc,

 

As per Posts 3/4 it all depends on the results of yr VA, eg perceived Risk. eg how often do you validate the COAs ? (hopefully containing relevance to authenticity).


Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C




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